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  1. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Hope to see more of you this fall Angela!

  2. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Hope to see more of you this fall Angela!

  3. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Hope to see more of you this fall Angela!

  4. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Hope to see more of you this fall Angela!

  5. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Hope to see more of you this fall Angela!

  6. john says:

    More a question

    Met data loggers yonks ago, about the same time that I met lock in amplifiers.
    Thinking of revisiting them.Is it possible to start with discrete transistors and a sensor to build a simple, very simple data logger ?

    • Angela says:

      Hi John,

      full disclosure: I never built something from gound up with discrete transistors, so take everything I write with a grain of salt.

      Short answer: It’s probably possible, however you will sure need a bunch of other parts to make it work, especially if you want to make use of it in a real-world setting, so the question will arise if it makes sense to built it this way.

      Long answer: For someone who understands lock-in amplifiers the electronics behind arduino and friends are probably not much of a secret and it won’t take long to find out that there are a bunch of unnecessary parts for your project on the board. The original idea of an arduino was to have an easy development/prototyping tool where you can experiment and once you are satisfied with the prototype results you build the final device with only the necessary parts.

      So, back to your original question: theoretically you can built a very simple datalogger with transistors and a sensor, but I’m rather sure you also want it to either display or store the data somewhere. So you need an LCD, or control a pen on a paper strip, or need an internet connection to a server, or an SD-Card, or whatever suits your needs and fits your energy requirements. You will also want to log the correct time, so you need to include a quartz or something that serves as a clock, or you need an internet connection to sync with a time server. A lot of tasks to achieve if you want to built it from ground up. They nearly shout for a microcontroler to help you. You can buy a development board like the arduino, experiment with different setups, displays, realtime clocks, whatever tickles your developer’s nerves and once you are satisfied you buy the parts you need and an additional ATMEGA328, flash the software, solder it together and that’s that.

      As prices for those boards are rather low (at least in Germany) it might even not be worth to invest time in building your own thing and just use the prototyping board in the final application. I did this especially with the ESP8266 on a NodeMCU board where I have all the neccessary things like WiFi and USB on board but which is still rather small.

      Hope that helps.
      Best,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi John,

      full disclosure: I never built something from gound up with discrete transistors, so take everything I write with a grain of salt.

      Short answer: It’s probably possible, however you will sure need a bunch of other parts to make it work, especially if you want to make use of it in a real-world setting, so the question will arise if it makes sense to built it this way.

      Long answer: For someone who understands lock-in amplifiers the electronics behind arduino and friends are probably not much of a secret and it won’t take long to find out that there are a bunch of unnecessary parts for your project on the board. The original idea of an arduino was to have an easy development/prototyping tool where you can experiment and once you are satisfied with the prototype results you build the final device with only the necessary parts.

      So, back to your original question: theoretically you can built a very simple datalogger with transistors and a sensor, but I’m rather sure you also want it to either display or store the data somewhere. So you need an LCD, or control a pen on a paper strip, or need an internet connection to a server, or an SD-Card, or whatever suits your needs and fits your energy requirements. You will also want to log the correct time, so you need to include a quartz or something that serves as a clock, or you need an internet connection to sync with a time server. A lot of tasks to achieve if you want to built it from ground up. They nearly shout for a microcontroler to help you. You can buy a development board like the arduino, experiment with different setups, displays, realtime clocks, whatever tickles your developer’s nerves and once you are satisfied you buy the parts you need and an additional ATMEGA328, flash the software, solder it together and that’s that.

      As prices for those boards are rather low (at least in Germany) it might even not be worth to invest time in building your own thing and just use the prototyping board in the final application. I did this especially with the ESP8266 on a NodeMCU board where I have all the neccessary things like WiFi and USB on board but which is still rather small.

      Hope that helps.
      Best,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi John,

      full disclosure: I never built something from gound up with discrete transistors, so take everything I write with a grain of salt.

      Short answer: It’s probably possible, however you will sure need a bunch of other parts to make it work, especially if you want to make use of it in a real-world setting, so the question will arise if it makes sense to built it this way.

      Long answer: For someone who understands lock-in amplifiers the electronics behind arduino and friends are probably not much of a secret and it won’t take long to find out that there are a bunch of unnecessary parts for your project on the board. The original idea of an arduino was to have an easy development/prototyping tool where you can experiment and once you are satisfied with the prototype results you build the final device with only the necessary parts.

      So, back to your original question: theoretically you can built a very simple datalogger with transistors and a sensor, but I’m rather sure you also want it to either display or store the data somewhere. So you need an LCD, or control a pen on a paper strip, or need an internet connection to a server, or an SD-Card, or whatever suits your needs and fits your energy requirements. You will also want to log the correct time, so you need to include a quartz or something that serves as a clock, or you need an internet connection to sync with a time server. A lot of tasks to achieve if you want to built it from ground up. They nearly shout for a microcontroler to help you. You can buy a development board like the arduino, experiment with different setups, displays, realtime clocks, whatever tickles your developer’s nerves and once you are satisfied you buy the parts you need and an additional ATMEGA328, flash the software, solder it together and that’s that.

      As prices for those boards are rather low (at least in Germany) it might even not be worth to invest time in building your own thing and just use the prototyping board in the final application. I did this especially with the ESP8266 on a NodeMCU board where I have all the neccessary things like WiFi and USB on board but which is still rather small.

      Hope that helps.
      Best,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi John,

      full disclosure: I never built something from gound up with discrete transistors, so take everything I write with a grain of salt.

      Short answer: It’s probably possible, however you will sure need a bunch of other parts to make it work, especially if you want to make use of it in a real-world setting, so the question will arise if it makes sense to built it this way.

      Long answer: For someone who understands lock-in amplifiers the electronics behind arduino and friends are probably not much of a secret and it won’t take long to find out that there are a bunch of unnecessary parts for your project on the board. The original idea of an arduino was to have an easy development/prototyping tool where you can experiment and once you are satisfied with the prototype results you build the final device with only the necessary parts.

      So, back to your original question: theoretically you can built a very simple datalogger with transistors and a sensor, but I’m rather sure you also want it to either display or store the data somewhere. So you need an LCD, or control a pen on a paper strip, or need an internet connection to a server, or an SD-Card, or whatever suits your needs and fits your energy requirements. You will also want to log the correct time, so you need to include a quartz or something that serves as a clock, or you need an internet connection to sync with a time server. A lot of tasks to achieve if you want to built it from ground up. They nearly shout for a microcontroler to help you. You can buy a development board like the arduino, experiment with different setups, displays, realtime clocks, whatever tickles your developer’s nerves and once you are satisfied you buy the parts you need and an additional ATMEGA328, flash the software, solder it together and that’s that.

      As prices for those boards are rather low (at least in Germany) it might even not be worth to invest time in building your own thing and just use the prototyping board in the final application. I did this especially with the ESP8266 on a NodeMCU board where I have all the neccessary things like WiFi and USB on board but which is still rather small.

      Hope that helps.
      Best,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi John,

      full disclosure: I never built something from gound up with discrete transistors, so take everything I write with a grain of salt.

      Short answer: It’s probably possible, however you will sure need a bunch of other parts to make it work, especially if you want to make use of it in a real-world setting, so the question will arise if it makes sense to built it this way.

      Long answer: For someone who understands lock-in amplifiers the electronics behind arduino and friends are probably not much of a secret and it won’t take long to find out that there are a bunch of unnecessary parts for your project on the board. The original idea of an arduino was to have an easy development/prototyping tool where you can experiment and once you are satisfied with the prototype results you build the final device with only the necessary parts.

      So, back to your original question: theoretically you can built a very simple datalogger with transistors and a sensor, but I’m rather sure you also want it to either display or store the data somewhere. So you need an LCD, or control a pen on a paper strip, or need an internet connection to a server, or an SD-Card, or whatever suits your needs and fits your energy requirements. You will also want to log the correct time, so you need to include a quartz or something that serves as a clock, or you need an internet connection to sync with a time server. A lot of tasks to achieve if you want to built it from ground up. They nearly shout for a microcontroler to help you. You can buy a development board like the arduino, experiment with different setups, displays, realtime clocks, whatever tickles your developer’s nerves and once you are satisfied you buy the parts you need and an additional ATMEGA328, flash the software, solder it together and that’s that.

      As prices for those boards are rather low (at least in Germany) it might even not be worth to invest time in building your own thing and just use the prototyping board in the final application. I did this especially with the ESP8266 on a NodeMCU board where I have all the neccessary things like WiFi and USB on board but which is still rather small.

      Hope that helps.
      Best,
      Angela

  7. john says:

    More a question

    Met data loggers yonks ago, about the same time that I met lock in amplifiers.
    Thinking of revisiting them.Is it possible to start with discrete transistors and a sensor to build a simple, very simple data logger ?

  8. john says:

    More a question

    Met data loggers yonks ago, about the same time that I met lock in amplifiers.
    Thinking of revisiting them.Is it possible to start with discrete transistors and a sensor to build a simple, very simple data logger ?

  9. john says:

    More a question

    Met data loggers yonks ago, about the same time that I met lock in amplifiers.
    Thinking of revisiting them.Is it possible to start with discrete transistors and a sensor to build a simple, very simple data logger ?

  10. john says:

    More a question

    Met data loggers yonks ago, about the same time that I met lock in amplifiers.
    Thinking of revisiting them.Is it possible to start with discrete transistors and a sensor to build a simple, very simple data logger ?

  11. Marie says:

    This is what finally convinced me that conservators and registrars must have been seperated at birth, since at least half of these apply to us as well – just last week I was indeed ready to threaten physical harm to someone who used my conservation-only scissors for cutting sticky tape (and then simply put them back without cleaning!).

    Thank you for the great list!

  12. Marie says:

    This is what finally convinced me that conservators and registrars must have been seperated at birth, since at least half of these apply to us as well – just last week I was indeed ready to threaten physical harm to someone who used my conservation-only scissors for cutting sticky tape (and then simply put them back without cleaning!).

    Thank you for the great list!

  13. Marie says:

    This is what finally convinced me that conservators and registrars must have been seperated at birth, since at least half of these apply to us as well – just last week I was indeed ready to threaten physical harm to someone who used my conservation-only scissors for cutting sticky tape (and then simply put them back without cleaning!).

    Thank you for the great list!

  14. Marie says:

    This is what finally convinced me that conservators and registrars must have been seperated at birth, since at least half of these apply to us as well – just last week I was indeed ready to threaten physical harm to someone who used my conservation-only scissors for cutting sticky tape (and then simply put them back without cleaning!).

    Thank you for the great list!

  15. Marie says:

    This is what finally convinced me that conservators and registrars must have been seperated at birth, since at least half of these apply to us as well – just last week I was indeed ready to threaten physical harm to someone who used my conservation-only scissors for cutting sticky tape (and then simply put them back without cleaning!).

    Thank you for the great list!

  16. Janice Klein says:

    I would suggest Karen’s suggestion. Certainly the sealed container can/should be left as it is. I would check with a conservator about any problems that might be caused by an unsealed, but securely closed container of alcohol, but unless there is a major hazard problem I would also leave the second bottle as it is. Should the whiskey in the second bottle need to be disposed of, I don’t think any of your collections colleagues would fault you should you choose a more personal way of safely disposing of the liquid.

  17. Janice Klein says:

    I would suggest Karen’s suggestion. Certainly the sealed container can/should be left as it is. I would check with a conservator about any problems that might be caused by an unsealed, but securely closed container of alcohol, but unless there is a major hazard problem I would also leave the second bottle as it is. Should the whiskey in the second bottle need to be disposed of, I don’t think any of your collections colleagues would fault you should you choose a more personal way of safely disposing of the liquid.

  18. Janice Klein says:

    I would suggest Karen’s suggestion. Certainly the sealed container can/should be left as it is. I would check with a conservator about any problems that might be caused by an unsealed, but securely closed container of alcohol, but unless there is a major hazard problem I would also leave the second bottle as it is. Should the whiskey in the second bottle need to be disposed of, I don’t think any of your collections colleagues would fault you should you choose a more personal way of safely disposing of the liquid.

  19. Janice Klein says:

    I would suggest Karen’s suggestion. Certainly the sealed container can/should be left as it is. I would check with a conservator about any problems that might be caused by an unsealed, but securely closed container of alcohol, but unless there is a major hazard problem I would also leave the second bottle as it is. Should the whiskey in the second bottle need to be disposed of, I don’t think any of your collections colleagues would fault you should you choose a more personal way of safely disposing of the liquid.

  20. Janice Klein says:

    I would suggest Karen’s suggestion. Certainly the sealed container can/should be left as it is. I would check with a conservator about any problems that might be caused by an unsealed, but securely closed container of alcohol, but unless there is a major hazard problem I would also leave the second bottle as it is. Should the whiskey in the second bottle need to be disposed of, I don’t think any of your collections colleagues would fault you should you choose a more personal way of safely disposing of the liquid.

  21. Karen Barlow says:

    My always caveat when dealing with liquids. If it is sealed and stable, leave it alone, but keep an I eye on it for changes. Why mess with something you don’t have to. If it is leaking, can cause a mess if accidentally tipped over, or strange substances appear on the exterior, time to do some dumping.
    As for question #2, it’s gotta be pretty smooth by now… Just sayin”…

  22. Karen Barlow says:

    My always caveat when dealing with liquids. If it is sealed and stable, leave it alone, but keep an I eye on it for changes. Why mess with something you don’t have to. If it is leaking, can cause a mess if accidentally tipped over, or strange substances appear on the exterior, time to do some dumping.
    As for question #2, it’s gotta be pretty smooth by now… Just sayin”…

  23. Karen Barlow says:

    My always caveat when dealing with liquids. If it is sealed and stable, leave it alone, but keep an I eye on it for changes. Why mess with something you don’t have to. If it is leaking, can cause a mess if accidentally tipped over, or strange substances appear on the exterior, time to do some dumping.
    As for question #2, it’s gotta be pretty smooth by now… Just sayin”…

  24. Karen Barlow says:

    My always caveat when dealing with liquids. If it is sealed and stable, leave it alone, but keep an I eye on it for changes. Why mess with something you don’t have to. If it is leaking, can cause a mess if accidentally tipped over, or strange substances appear on the exterior, time to do some dumping.
    As for question #2, it’s gotta be pretty smooth by now… Just sayin”…

  25. Karen Barlow says:

    My always caveat when dealing with liquids. If it is sealed and stable, leave it alone, but keep an I eye on it for changes. Why mess with something you don’t have to. If it is leaking, can cause a mess if accidentally tipped over, or strange substances appear on the exterior, time to do some dumping.
    As for question #2, it’s gotta be pretty smooth by now… Just sayin”…

  26. azian says:

    hi. sorry for asking. i’m a final year student and do the project related to this datalogger with BPW34 photodiode to detect the irradiance of solar and record it. but there are problem with the connection and the coding. can i ask your opinion about it?

  27. azian says:

    hi. sorry for asking. i’m a final year student and do the project related to this datalogger with BPW34 photodiode to detect the irradiance of solar and record it. but there are problem with the connection and the coding. can i ask your opinion about it?

  28. azian says:

    hi. sorry for asking. i’m a final year student and do the project related to this datalogger with BPW34 photodiode to detect the irradiance of solar and record it. but there are problem with the connection and the coding. can i ask your opinion about it?

  29. azian says:

    hi. sorry for asking. i’m a final year student and do the project related to this datalogger with BPW34 photodiode to detect the irradiance of solar and record it. but there are problem with the connection and the coding. can i ask your opinion about it?

  30. azian says:

    hi. sorry for asking. i’m a final year student and do the project related to this datalogger with BPW34 photodiode to detect the irradiance of solar and record it. but there are problem with the connection and the coding. can i ask your opinion about it?

  31. […] Trek, Angela: „Kultur-Tipp für die Ohren und fürs Hirn: Bermudafunk“ (26.10.14) // @RegistrarTrekDe (Radio, Interaktion, […]

  32. […] Trek, Angela: „Kultur-Tipp für die Ohren und fürs Hirn: Bermudafunk“ (26.10.14) // @RegistrarTrekDe (Radio, Interaktion, […]

  33. […] Trek, Angela: „Kultur-Tipp für die Ohren und fürs Hirn: Bermudafunk“ (26.10.14) // @RegistrarTrekDe (Radio, Interaktion, […]

  34. […] Trek, Angela: „Kultur-Tipp für die Ohren und fürs Hirn: Bermudafunk“ (26.10.14) // @RegistrarTrekDe (Radio, Interaktion, […]

  35. […] Trek, Angela: „Kultur-Tipp für die Ohren und fürs Hirn: Bermudafunk“ (26.10.14) // @RegistrarTrekDe (Radio, Interaktion, […]

  36. Janice Klein says:

    I worked with an exhibit developer who was “famous” among the collection staff for never putting objects back on the right shelf. We finally figured out that his standard behavior was to pick up an object, look at it, and put it on the shelf behind him! Whenever we couldn’t find an object we knew he had worked with, we always looked diagonally across the aisle and, more often than not, found the missing piece! Not sure if this is funny or tragic.

  37. Janice Klein says:

    I worked with an exhibit developer who was “famous” among the collection staff for never putting objects back on the right shelf. We finally figured out that his standard behavior was to pick up an object, look at it, and put it on the shelf behind him! Whenever we couldn’t find an object we knew he had worked with, we always looked diagonally across the aisle and, more often than not, found the missing piece! Not sure if this is funny or tragic.

  38. Janice Klein says:

    I worked with an exhibit developer who was “famous” among the collection staff for never putting objects back on the right shelf. We finally figured out that his standard behavior was to pick up an object, look at it, and put it on the shelf behind him! Whenever we couldn’t find an object we knew he had worked with, we always looked diagonally across the aisle and, more often than not, found the missing piece! Not sure if this is funny or tragic.

  39. Janice Klein says:

    I worked with an exhibit developer who was “famous” among the collection staff for never putting objects back on the right shelf. We finally figured out that his standard behavior was to pick up an object, look at it, and put it on the shelf behind him! Whenever we couldn’t find an object we knew he had worked with, we always looked diagonally across the aisle and, more often than not, found the missing piece! Not sure if this is funny or tragic.

  40. Janice Klein says:

    I worked with an exhibit developer who was “famous” among the collection staff for never putting objects back on the right shelf. We finally figured out that his standard behavior was to pick up an object, look at it, and put it on the shelf behind him! Whenever we couldn’t find an object we knew he had worked with, we always looked diagonally across the aisle and, more often than not, found the missing piece! Not sure if this is funny or tragic.

  41. Evelyn fidler says:

    Also an extra nudge to curators to get their requests in early for objects in case they are not where they should be.

  42. Evelyn fidler says:

    Also an extra nudge to curators to get their requests in early for objects in case they are not where they should be.

  43. Evelyn fidler says:

    Also an extra nudge to curators to get their requests in early for objects in case they are not where they should be.

  44. Evelyn fidler says:

    Also an extra nudge to curators to get their requests in early for objects in case they are not where they should be.

  45. Evelyn fidler says:

    Also an extra nudge to curators to get their requests in early for objects in case they are not where they should be.

  46. Alicia Woods says:

    I am the first collections manager for the agency I work for. My entire career revolves around trying to reconcile Deeds of Gift, Loans, Transfers, etc., from as long as 102 years ago. This is always on my mind and everything I do, including writing our Collections Program Best Practices Manual is making sure that standards we put in place today are relevant, meaningful, and carefully explained as well as carried on. Obviously as laws and standards change, our practice will too, but it is my job to make sure we move forward with all of these things in mind for the future and those that come after us. Leaving the statewide collection better organized, more concise, healthier, meaningful/significant, and relevant is our main focus in this program. Looking forward to seeing more on this topic!

  47. Alicia Woods says:

    I am the first collections manager for the agency I work for. My entire career revolves around trying to reconcile Deeds of Gift, Loans, Transfers, etc., from as long as 102 years ago. This is always on my mind and everything I do, including writing our Collections Program Best Practices Manual is making sure that standards we put in place today are relevant, meaningful, and carefully explained as well as carried on. Obviously as laws and standards change, our practice will too, but it is my job to make sure we move forward with all of these things in mind for the future and those that come after us. Leaving the statewide collection better organized, more concise, healthier, meaningful/significant, and relevant is our main focus in this program. Looking forward to seeing more on this topic!

  48. Alicia Woods says:

    I am the first collections manager for the agency I work for. My entire career revolves around trying to reconcile Deeds of Gift, Loans, Transfers, etc., from as long as 102 years ago. This is always on my mind and everything I do, including writing our Collections Program Best Practices Manual is making sure that standards we put in place today are relevant, meaningful, and carefully explained as well as carried on. Obviously as laws and standards change, our practice will too, but it is my job to make sure we move forward with all of these things in mind for the future and those that come after us. Leaving the statewide collection better organized, more concise, healthier, meaningful/significant, and relevant is our main focus in this program. Looking forward to seeing more on this topic!

  49. Alicia Woods says:

    I am the first collections manager for the agency I work for. My entire career revolves around trying to reconcile Deeds of Gift, Loans, Transfers, etc., from as long as 102 years ago. This is always on my mind and everything I do, including writing our Collections Program Best Practices Manual is making sure that standards we put in place today are relevant, meaningful, and carefully explained as well as carried on. Obviously as laws and standards change, our practice will too, but it is my job to make sure we move forward with all of these things in mind for the future and those that come after us. Leaving the statewide collection better organized, more concise, healthier, meaningful/significant, and relevant is our main focus in this program. Looking forward to seeing more on this topic!

  50. Alicia Woods says:

    I am the first collections manager for the agency I work for. My entire career revolves around trying to reconcile Deeds of Gift, Loans, Transfers, etc., from as long as 102 years ago. This is always on my mind and everything I do, including writing our Collections Program Best Practices Manual is making sure that standards we put in place today are relevant, meaningful, and carefully explained as well as carried on. Obviously as laws and standards change, our practice will too, but it is my job to make sure we move forward with all of these things in mind for the future and those that come after us. Leaving the statewide collection better organized, more concise, healthier, meaningful/significant, and relevant is our main focus in this program. Looking forward to seeing more on this topic!

  51. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Thanks for posting this! I saw a link to it on twitter last night and wondered how to follow the discussion.

  52. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Thanks for posting this! I saw a link to it on twitter last night and wondered how to follow the discussion.

  53. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Thanks for posting this! I saw a link to it on twitter last night and wondered how to follow the discussion.

  54. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Thanks for posting this! I saw a link to it on twitter last night and wondered how to follow the discussion.

  55. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Thanks for posting this! I saw a link to it on twitter last night and wondered how to follow the discussion.

  56. Rachel Farkas says:

    Living vicariously through the sense of satisfaction solving this mystery brings!

  57. Rachel Farkas says:

    Living vicariously through the sense of satisfaction solving this mystery brings!

  58. Rachel Farkas says:

    Living vicariously through the sense of satisfaction solving this mystery brings!

  59. Rachel Farkas says:

    Living vicariously through the sense of satisfaction solving this mystery brings!

  60. Rachel Farkas says:

    Living vicariously through the sense of satisfaction solving this mystery brings!

  61. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Love it! I had a volunteer catalogue an iron eagle as a FIC last week. Yesterday I came across a picture of a stove with same eagle on top! What a feeling of satisfaction!

  62. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Love it! I had a volunteer catalogue an iron eagle as a FIC last week. Yesterday I came across a picture of a stove with same eagle on top! What a feeling of satisfaction!

  63. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Love it! I had a volunteer catalogue an iron eagle as a FIC last week. Yesterday I came across a picture of a stove with same eagle on top! What a feeling of satisfaction!

  64. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Love it! I had a volunteer catalogue an iron eagle as a FIC last week. Yesterday I came across a picture of a stove with same eagle on top! What a feeling of satisfaction!

  65. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Love it! I had a volunteer catalogue an iron eagle as a FIC last week. Yesterday I came across a picture of a stove with same eagle on top! What a feeling of satisfaction!

  66. Did you know that John Simmons has also created a board game to help you understand Collections Management Policies called Monopolicy? You can download if for free. http://www.museumstudy.com/courses/course-list/policies-for-managing-collections/

  67. Did you know that John Simmons has also created a board game to help you understand Collections Management Policies called Monopolicy? You can download if for free. http://www.museumstudy.com/courses/course-list/policies-for-managing-collections/

  68. Did you know that John Simmons has also created a board game to help you understand Collections Management Policies called Monopolicy? You can download if for free. http://www.museumstudy.com/courses/course-list/policies-for-managing-collections/

  69. Did you know that John Simmons has also created a board game to help you understand Collections Management Policies called Monopolicy? You can download if for free. http://www.museumstudy.com/courses/course-list/policies-for-managing-collections/

  70. Did you know that John Simmons has also created a board game to help you understand Collections Management Policies called Monopolicy? You can download if for free. http://www.museumstudy.com/courses/course-list/policies-for-managing-collections/

  71. Rosana Calderón Martin del Campo says:

    Merry Christmas and happy new year!!!

  72. Rosana Calderón Martin del Campo says:

    Merry Christmas and happy new year!!!

  73. Rosana Calderón Martin del Campo says:

    Merry Christmas and happy new year!!!

  74. Rosana Calderón Martin del Campo says:

    Merry Christmas and happy new year!!!

  75. Rosana Calderón Martin del Campo says:

    Merry Christmas and happy new year!!!

  76. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    Wishing everyone a happy and healthy new year!!

  77. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    Wishing everyone a happy and healthy new year!!

  78. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    Wishing everyone a happy and healthy new year!!

  79. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    Wishing everyone a happy and healthy new year!!

  80. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    Wishing everyone a happy and healthy new year!!

  81. Wow Angela, you certainly haven’t lost your touch! The cat analogy works very well, and I love the way you point out the connections to collections work, just in case any of us missed them. I also enjoyed the creativity in finding ways to entice the cat to take her meds, and the clarity explaining the methods. You are a consummate communicator and a born teacher!

  82. Wow Angela, you certainly haven’t lost your touch! The cat analogy works very well, and I love the way you point out the connections to collections work, just in case any of us missed them. I also enjoyed the creativity in finding ways to entice the cat to take her meds, and the clarity explaining the methods. You are a consummate communicator and a born teacher!

  83. Wow Angela, you certainly haven’t lost your touch! The cat analogy works very well, and I love the way you point out the connections to collections work, just in case any of us missed them. I also enjoyed the creativity in finding ways to entice the cat to take her meds, and the clarity explaining the methods. You are a consummate communicator and a born teacher!

  84. Wow Angela, you certainly haven’t lost your touch! The cat analogy works very well, and I love the way you point out the connections to collections work, just in case any of us missed them. I also enjoyed the creativity in finding ways to entice the cat to take her meds, and the clarity explaining the methods. You are a consummate communicator and a born teacher!

  85. Wow Angela, you certainly haven’t lost your touch! The cat analogy works very well, and I love the way you point out the connections to collections work, just in case any of us missed them. I also enjoyed the creativity in finding ways to entice the cat to take her meds, and the clarity explaining the methods. You are a consummate communicator and a born teacher!

  86. Catherine Cormon says:

    Happy New Year Angela and colleagues, from rainy Amsterdam.

    And thank you so much for all the good work you are doing with this blog! It’s a pleasure to read, food for thought and a useful resource all rolled into one.

  87. Catherine Cormon says:

    Happy New Year Angela and colleagues, from rainy Amsterdam.

    And thank you so much for all the good work you are doing with this blog! It’s a pleasure to read, food for thought and a useful resource all rolled into one.

  88. Catherine Cormon says:

    Happy New Year Angela and colleagues, from rainy Amsterdam.

    And thank you so much for all the good work you are doing with this blog! It’s a pleasure to read, food for thought and a useful resource all rolled into one.

  89. Catherine Cormon says:

    Happy New Year Angela and colleagues, from rainy Amsterdam.

    And thank you so much for all the good work you are doing with this blog! It’s a pleasure to read, food for thought and a useful resource all rolled into one.

  90. Catherine Cormon says:

    Happy New Year Angela and colleagues, from rainy Amsterdam.

    And thank you so much for all the good work you are doing with this blog! It’s a pleasure to read, food for thought and a useful resource all rolled into one.

  91. Janice Klein says:

    Just sent this to my family so they can understand some of what I do! Happy holidays, Angela!

  92. Janice Klein says:

    Just sent this to my family so they can understand some of what I do! Happy holidays, Angela!

  93. Janice Klein says:

    Just sent this to my family so they can understand some of what I do! Happy holidays, Angela!

  94. Janice Klein says:

    Just sent this to my family so they can understand some of what I do! Happy holidays, Angela!

  95. Janice Klein says:

    Just sent this to my family so they can understand some of what I do! Happy holidays, Angela!

  96. Edith says:

    Frohe und schöne Weihnachten, kellemes karácsonyi ünnepeket, god jul & merry christmas to you all!

  97. Edith says:

    Frohe und schöne Weihnachten, kellemes karácsonyi ünnepeket, god jul & merry christmas to you all!

  98. Edith says:

    Frohe und schöne Weihnachten, kellemes karácsonyi ünnepeket, god jul & merry christmas to you all!

  99. Edith says:

    Frohe und schöne Weihnachten, kellemes karácsonyi ünnepeket, god jul & merry christmas to you all!

  100. Edith says:

    Frohe und schöne Weihnachten, kellemes karácsonyi ünnepeket, god jul & merry christmas to you all!

  101. Susan says:

    Fröhliche Weihnachten! Angela from Fair New Mexico!

  102. Susan says:

    Fröhliche Weihnachten! Angela from Fair New Mexico!

  103. Susan says:

    Fröhliche Weihnachten! Angela from Fair New Mexico!

  104. Susan says:

    Fröhliche Weihnachten! Angela from Fair New Mexico!

  105. Susan says:

    Fröhliche Weihnachten! Angela from Fair New Mexico!

  106. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Merry Christmas Angela! I am fortunate as year end for government comes March 31st. A more reasonable time.

  107. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Merry Christmas Angela! I am fortunate as year end for government comes March 31st. A more reasonable time.

  108. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Merry Christmas Angela! I am fortunate as year end for government comes March 31st. A more reasonable time.

  109. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Merry Christmas Angela! I am fortunate as year end for government comes March 31st. A more reasonable time.

  110. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Merry Christmas Angela! I am fortunate as year end for government comes March 31st. A more reasonable time.

  111. Molly Hope says:

    Merry Christmas and a happy new year to you, too!

  112. Molly Hope says:

    Merry Christmas and a happy new year to you, too!

  113. Molly Hope says:

    Merry Christmas and a happy new year to you, too!

  114. Molly Hope says:

    Merry Christmas and a happy new year to you, too!

  115. Molly Hope says:

    Merry Christmas and a happy new year to you, too!

  116. Sue Taylor says:

    I also love cats (have 4) and this analogy is spot on! It’s a good teaching tool for those at your museum who have no clue about what collections management is all about. But they do understand taking care of animals. Thank you so much for sharing this.

  117. Sue Taylor says:

    I also love cats (have 4) and this analogy is spot on! It’s a good teaching tool for those at your museum who have no clue about what collections management is all about. But they do understand taking care of animals. Thank you so much for sharing this.

  118. Sue Taylor says:

    I also love cats (have 4) and this analogy is spot on! It’s a good teaching tool for those at your museum who have no clue about what collections management is all about. But they do understand taking care of animals. Thank you so much for sharing this.

  119. Sue Taylor says:

    I also love cats (have 4) and this analogy is spot on! It’s a good teaching tool for those at your museum who have no clue about what collections management is all about. But they do understand taking care of animals. Thank you so much for sharing this.

  120. Sue Taylor says:

    I also love cats (have 4) and this analogy is spot on! It’s a good teaching tool for those at your museum who have no clue about what collections management is all about. But they do understand taking care of animals. Thank you so much for sharing this.

  121. A very sympathetic way to explain how complex documentations should and could be and that every single step has its own importance and consequences for future works.

  122. A very sympathetic way to explain how complex documentations should and could be and that every single step has its own importance and consequences for future works.

  123. A very sympathetic way to explain how complex documentations should and could be and that every single step has its own importance and consequences for future works.

  124. A very sympathetic way to explain how complex documentations should and could be and that every single step has its own importance and consequences for future works.

  125. A very sympathetic way to explain how complex documentations should and could be and that every single step has its own importance and consequences for future works.

  126. M. Susan Barger says:

    Brovo, Angela – Very good story and lesson! Blotto approves!

  127. M. Susan Barger says:

    Brovo, Angela – Very good story and lesson! Blotto approves!

  128. M. Susan Barger says:

    Brovo, Angela – Very good story and lesson! Blotto approves!

  129. M. Susan Barger says:

    Brovo, Angela – Very good story and lesson! Blotto approves!

  130. M. Susan Barger says:

    Brovo, Angela – Very good story and lesson! Blotto approves!

  131. Evelyn Fidler says:

    as a cat lover I love this analogy!

  132. Evelyn Fidler says:

    as a cat lover I love this analogy!

  133. Evelyn Fidler says:

    as a cat lover I love this analogy!

  134. Evelyn Fidler says:

    as a cat lover I love this analogy!

  135. Evelyn Fidler says:

    as a cat lover I love this analogy!

  136. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Is there a cost to join?

    • Amy Heggemeyer says:

      Hi Evelyn, Collections Stewardship is a professional network that you can join as part of your AAM membership.

    • Amy Heggemeyer says:

      Hi Evelyn, Collections Stewardship is a professional network that you can join as part of your AAM membership.

    • Amy Heggemeyer says:

      Hi Evelyn, Collections Stewardship is a professional network that you can join as part of your AAM membership.

    • Amy Heggemeyer says:

      Hi Evelyn, Collections Stewardship is a professional network that you can join as part of your AAM membership.

    • Amy Heggemeyer says:

      Hi Evelyn, Collections Stewardship is a professional network that you can join as part of your AAM membership.

  137. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Is there a cost to join?

  138. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Is there a cost to join?

  139. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Is there a cost to join?

  140. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Is there a cost to join?

  141. Jackie Hoff says:

    I just love that this finally happened…way to go 🙂 🙂 🙂

  142. Jackie Hoff says:

    I just love that this finally happened…way to go 🙂 🙂 🙂

  143. Jackie Hoff says:

    I just love that this finally happened…way to go 🙂 🙂 🙂

  144. Jackie Hoff says:

    I just love that this finally happened…way to go 🙂 🙂 🙂

  145. Jackie Hoff says:

    I just love that this finally happened…way to go 🙂 🙂 🙂

  146. RGL says:

    Would you be kind enough to contact me. I am not a troll, and could use your help determining if or when Landis visited here.

  147. RGL says:

    Would you be kind enough to contact me. I am not a troll, and could use your help determining if or when Landis visited here.

  148. RGL says:

    Would you be kind enough to contact me. I am not a troll, and could use your help determining if or when Landis visited here.

  149. RGL says:

    Would you be kind enough to contact me. I am not a troll, and could use your help determining if or when Landis visited here.

  150. RGL says:

    Would you be kind enough to contact me. I am not a troll, and could use your help determining if or when Landis visited here.

  151. Leininger says:

    Chuckles of laughter Beau. The Sleuth.

  152. Leininger says:

    Chuckles of laughter Beau. The Sleuth.

  153. Leininger says:

    Chuckles of laughter Beau. The Sleuth.

  154. Leininger says:

    Chuckles of laughter Beau. The Sleuth.

  155. Leininger says:

    Chuckles of laughter Beau. The Sleuth.

  156. Beau says:

    I recently watched the documentary Art and Craft which led me here. I read Mr. Leiniger’s posts and to be frank, I found him to come off as rather full of himself as he was in the documentary. In his posts he repeatedly refers to himself in first person and seems to portray himself as a man who cured cancer instead of finding a forger.
    He talks about his life as a Registrar as if he was the most important person at the museum yet now years later he drops out to work in an Amazon warehouse? He wants us to see him as a big star in the Museum world yet he is very unwelcome back in the world. He claims he doesn’t want to get back into the Art World but clearly he is saying that to protect his own ego. If Mr. LEiniger did this amazing feat as a registrar by discovering Landis, why hasn’t he had numerous job offers, or even one job offer as a registrar? Why was he shut out of the Art world when he brags about himself being one of the best registrars in the world since others never caught Landis before him? Could it be that Mr. leiniger’s own words in blogs and in interviews made him equally unlked in his field as well as people who read his blog and watched him in the doc? Humility, compassion and self grandiosity are clearly three traits Mr. leiniger doesn’t possess. Perhaps if he did people would want him to work in their museums. I wouldn’t donate a painting I owned to a museum if I had to interact with LEiniger and I believe that is why he isn’t working in his field. Cultivating relationships with collectors to benefit the museum is vital in his field yet I haven’t found one friend I have asked who would want to deal with him ever. We will gladly find another museum to donate to just so we wouldn’t have to listen to LEiniger brag about himself one more time. I have had the misfortune of hearing him speak a few times and would like that time spent with him, back. Concenus says I’m not the only person who feels this strongly.

  157. Beau says:

    I recently watched the documentary Art and Craft which led me here. I read Mr. Leiniger’s posts and to be frank, I found him to come off as rather full of himself as he was in the documentary. In his posts he repeatedly refers to himself in first person and seems to portray himself as a man who cured cancer instead of finding a forger.
    He talks about his life as a Registrar as if he was the most important person at the museum yet now years later he drops out to work in an Amazon warehouse? He wants us to see him as a big star in the Museum world yet he is very unwelcome back in the world. He claims he doesn’t want to get back into the Art World but clearly he is saying that to protect his own ego. If Mr. LEiniger did this amazing feat as a registrar by discovering Landis, why hasn’t he had numerous job offers, or even one job offer as a registrar? Why was he shut out of the Art world when he brags about himself being one of the best registrars in the world since others never caught Landis before him? Could it be that Mr. leiniger’s own words in blogs and in interviews made him equally unlked in his field as well as people who read his blog and watched him in the doc? Humility, compassion and self grandiosity are clearly three traits Mr. leiniger doesn’t possess. Perhaps if he did people would want him to work in their museums. I wouldn’t donate a painting I owned to a museum if I had to interact with LEiniger and I believe that is why he isn’t working in his field. Cultivating relationships with collectors to benefit the museum is vital in his field yet I haven’t found one friend I have asked who would want to deal with him ever. We will gladly find another museum to donate to just so we wouldn’t have to listen to LEiniger brag about himself one more time. I have had the misfortune of hearing him speak a few times and would like that time spent with him, back. Concenus says I’m not the only person who feels this strongly.

  158. Beau says:

    I recently watched the documentary Art and Craft which led me here. I read Mr. Leiniger’s posts and to be frank, I found him to come off as rather full of himself as he was in the documentary. In his posts he repeatedly refers to himself in first person and seems to portray himself as a man who cured cancer instead of finding a forger.
    He talks about his life as a Registrar as if he was the most important person at the museum yet now years later he drops out to work in an Amazon warehouse? He wants us to see him as a big star in the Museum world yet he is very unwelcome back in the world. He claims he doesn’t want to get back into the Art World but clearly he is saying that to protect his own ego. If Mr. LEiniger did this amazing feat as a registrar by discovering Landis, why hasn’t he had numerous job offers, or even one job offer as a registrar? Why was he shut out of the Art world when he brags about himself being one of the best registrars in the world since others never caught Landis before him? Could it be that Mr. leiniger’s own words in blogs and in interviews made him equally unlked in his field as well as people who read his blog and watched him in the doc? Humility, compassion and self grandiosity are clearly three traits Mr. leiniger doesn’t possess. Perhaps if he did people would want him to work in their museums. I wouldn’t donate a painting I owned to a museum if I had to interact with LEiniger and I believe that is why he isn’t working in his field. Cultivating relationships with collectors to benefit the museum is vital in his field yet I haven’t found one friend I have asked who would want to deal with him ever. We will gladly find another museum to donate to just so we wouldn’t have to listen to LEiniger brag about himself one more time. I have had the misfortune of hearing him speak a few times and would like that time spent with him, back. Concenus says I’m not the only person who feels this strongly.

  159. Beau says:

    I recently watched the documentary Art and Craft which led me here. I read Mr. Leiniger’s posts and to be frank, I found him to come off as rather full of himself as he was in the documentary. In his posts he repeatedly refers to himself in first person and seems to portray himself as a man who cured cancer instead of finding a forger.
    He talks about his life as a Registrar as if he was the most important person at the museum yet now years later he drops out to work in an Amazon warehouse? He wants us to see him as a big star in the Museum world yet he is very unwelcome back in the world. He claims he doesn’t want to get back into the Art World but clearly he is saying that to protect his own ego. If Mr. LEiniger did this amazing feat as a registrar by discovering Landis, why hasn’t he had numerous job offers, or even one job offer as a registrar? Why was he shut out of the Art world when he brags about himself being one of the best registrars in the world since others never caught Landis before him? Could it be that Mr. leiniger’s own words in blogs and in interviews made him equally unlked in his field as well as people who read his blog and watched him in the doc? Humility, compassion and self grandiosity are clearly three traits Mr. leiniger doesn’t possess. Perhaps if he did people would want him to work in their museums. I wouldn’t donate a painting I owned to a museum if I had to interact with LEiniger and I believe that is why he isn’t working in his field. Cultivating relationships with collectors to benefit the museum is vital in his field yet I haven’t found one friend I have asked who would want to deal with him ever. We will gladly find another museum to donate to just so we wouldn’t have to listen to LEiniger brag about himself one more time. I have had the misfortune of hearing him speak a few times and would like that time spent with him, back. Concenus says I’m not the only person who feels this strongly.

  160. Beau says:

    I recently watched the documentary Art and Craft which led me here. I read Mr. Leiniger’s posts and to be frank, I found him to come off as rather full of himself as he was in the documentary. In his posts he repeatedly refers to himself in first person and seems to portray himself as a man who cured cancer instead of finding a forger.
    He talks about his life as a Registrar as if he was the most important person at the museum yet now years later he drops out to work in an Amazon warehouse? He wants us to see him as a big star in the Museum world yet he is very unwelcome back in the world. He claims he doesn’t want to get back into the Art World but clearly he is saying that to protect his own ego. If Mr. LEiniger did this amazing feat as a registrar by discovering Landis, why hasn’t he had numerous job offers, or even one job offer as a registrar? Why was he shut out of the Art world when he brags about himself being one of the best registrars in the world since others never caught Landis before him? Could it be that Mr. leiniger’s own words in blogs and in interviews made him equally unlked in his field as well as people who read his blog and watched him in the doc? Humility, compassion and self grandiosity are clearly three traits Mr. leiniger doesn’t possess. Perhaps if he did people would want him to work in their museums. I wouldn’t donate a painting I owned to a museum if I had to interact with LEiniger and I believe that is why he isn’t working in his field. Cultivating relationships with collectors to benefit the museum is vital in his field yet I haven’t found one friend I have asked who would want to deal with him ever. We will gladly find another museum to donate to just so we wouldn’t have to listen to LEiniger brag about himself one more time. I have had the misfortune of hearing him speak a few times and would like that time spent with him, back. Concenus says I’m not the only person who feels this strongly.

  161. Sandy Marker says:

    Greetings! Very helpful advice within this post! It is the little changes which will make the greatest changes. Thanks for sharing!

  162. Sandy Marker says:

    Greetings! Very helpful advice within this post! It is the little changes which will make the greatest changes. Thanks for sharing!

  163. Sandy Marker says:

    Greetings! Very helpful advice within this post! It is the little changes which will make the greatest changes. Thanks for sharing!

  164. Sandy Marker says:

    Greetings! Very helpful advice within this post! It is the little changes which will make the greatest changes. Thanks for sharing!

  165. Sandy Marker says:

    Greetings! Very helpful advice within this post! It is the little changes which will make the greatest changes. Thanks for sharing!

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  171. Evelyn Fidler says:

    another good explanation https://vimeo.com/36752317

  172. Evelyn Fidler says:

    another good explanation https://vimeo.com/36752317

  173. Evelyn Fidler says:

    another good explanation https://vimeo.com/36752317

  174. Evelyn Fidler says:

    another good explanation https://vimeo.com/36752317

  175. Evelyn Fidler says:

    another good explanation https://vimeo.com/36752317

  176. Evelyn Fidler says:

    It seems as if we have been exploring this technology in Canada for a couple of years. http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/sgc-cms/nouvelles-news/anglais-english/?p=9982 I am getting more excited about the concept.

  177. Evelyn Fidler says:

    It seems as if we have been exploring this technology in Canada for a couple of years. http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/sgc-cms/nouvelles-news/anglais-english/?p=9982 I am getting more excited about the concept.

  178. Evelyn Fidler says:

    It seems as if we have been exploring this technology in Canada for a couple of years. http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/sgc-cms/nouvelles-news/anglais-english/?p=9982 I am getting more excited about the concept.

  179. Evelyn Fidler says:

    It seems as if we have been exploring this technology in Canada for a couple of years. http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/sgc-cms/nouvelles-news/anglais-english/?p=9982 I am getting more excited about the concept.

  180. Evelyn Fidler says:

    It seems as if we have been exploring this technology in Canada for a couple of years. http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/sgc-cms/nouvelles-news/anglais-english/?p=9982 I am getting more excited about the concept.

  181. James McNutt says:

    A great project using LInked Open Data is the American Art Collaborative. You can find information about it at americanartcollaborative.org. The Executive Director is Eleanor Fink.

  182. James McNutt says:

    A great project using LInked Open Data is the American Art Collaborative. You can find information about it at americanartcollaborative.org. The Executive Director is Eleanor Fink.

  183. James McNutt says:

    A great project using LInked Open Data is the American Art Collaborative. You can find information about it at americanartcollaborative.org. The Executive Director is Eleanor Fink.

  184. James McNutt says:

    A great project using LInked Open Data is the American Art Collaborative. You can find information about it at americanartcollaborative.org. The Executive Director is Eleanor Fink.

  185. James McNutt says:

    A great project using LInked Open Data is the American Art Collaborative. You can find information about it at americanartcollaborative.org. The Executive Director is Eleanor Fink.

  186. Evelyn Fidler says:

    So far the disadvantages outweigh the advantages for collections that are primarily non artworks?

    • Richard Light says:

      I don’t think that the issues are subject-specific. Museums record the historical context of their objects, and this could form part of a Linked History resource. However, they lack tools to render their catalogue data as Linked Data properties and classes, and we all lack a shared framework with which to build a shared web-scale history database.

    • Richard Light says:

      I don’t think that the issues are subject-specific. Museums record the historical context of their objects, and this could form part of a Linked History resource. However, they lack tools to render their catalogue data as Linked Data properties and classes, and we all lack a shared framework with which to build a shared web-scale history database.

    • Richard Light says:

      I don’t think that the issues are subject-specific. Museums record the historical context of their objects, and this could form part of a Linked History resource. However, they lack tools to render their catalogue data as Linked Data properties and classes, and we all lack a shared framework with which to build a shared web-scale history database.

    • Richard Light says:

      I don’t think that the issues are subject-specific. Museums record the historical context of their objects, and this could form part of a Linked History resource. However, they lack tools to render their catalogue data as Linked Data properties and classes, and we all lack a shared framework with which to build a shared web-scale history database.

    • Richard Light says:

      I don’t think that the issues are subject-specific. Museums record the historical context of their objects, and this could form part of a Linked History resource. However, they lack tools to render their catalogue data as Linked Data properties and classes, and we all lack a shared framework with which to build a shared web-scale history database.

  187. Evelyn Fidler says:

    So far the disadvantages outweigh the advantages for collections that are primarily non artworks?

  188. Evelyn Fidler says:

    So far the disadvantages outweigh the advantages for collections that are primarily non artworks?

  189. Evelyn Fidler says:

    So far the disadvantages outweigh the advantages for collections that are primarily non artworks?

  190. Evelyn Fidler says:

    So far the disadvantages outweigh the advantages for collections that are primarily non artworks?

  191. Susan Barger says:

    I see the cats have good taste!

  192. Susan Barger says:

    I see the cats have good taste!

  193. Susan Barger says:

    I see the cats have good taste!

  194. Susan Barger says:

    I see the cats have good taste!

  195. Susan Barger says:

    I see the cats have good taste!

  196. Kristi J. Dunn says:

    I thoroughly appreciate this article! As the Registrar of a mid-sized museum, I have my everyday wear (nice-ish boots or close-toed shoes, nice pants/jeans, casual but nice shirt), but in my desk drawer and under my desk I have my steel-toed work boots, a pair of black high heel dress boots, a sloppy t-shirt, and a dress jacket. You never know what will happen on any given day!

  197. Kristi J. Dunn says:

    I thoroughly appreciate this article! As the Registrar of a mid-sized museum, I have my everyday wear (nice-ish boots or close-toed shoes, nice pants/jeans, casual but nice shirt), but in my desk drawer and under my desk I have my steel-toed work boots, a pair of black high heel dress boots, a sloppy t-shirt, and a dress jacket. You never know what will happen on any given day!

  198. Kristi J. Dunn says:

    I thoroughly appreciate this article! As the Registrar of a mid-sized museum, I have my everyday wear (nice-ish boots or close-toed shoes, nice pants/jeans, casual but nice shirt), but in my desk drawer and under my desk I have my steel-toed work boots, a pair of black high heel dress boots, a sloppy t-shirt, and a dress jacket. You never know what will happen on any given day!

  199. Kristi J. Dunn says:

    I thoroughly appreciate this article! As the Registrar of a mid-sized museum, I have my everyday wear (nice-ish boots or close-toed shoes, nice pants/jeans, casual but nice shirt), but in my desk drawer and under my desk I have my steel-toed work boots, a pair of black high heel dress boots, a sloppy t-shirt, and a dress jacket. You never know what will happen on any given day!

  200. Kristi J. Dunn says:

    I thoroughly appreciate this article! As the Registrar of a mid-sized museum, I have my everyday wear (nice-ish boots or close-toed shoes, nice pants/jeans, casual but nice shirt), but in my desk drawer and under my desk I have my steel-toed work boots, a pair of black high heel dress boots, a sloppy t-shirt, and a dress jacket. You never know what will happen on any given day!

  201. Evelyn Fidler says:

    love it!

  202. Evelyn Fidler says:

    love it!

  203. Evelyn Fidler says:

    love it!

  204. Evelyn Fidler says:

    love it!

  205. Evelyn Fidler says:

    love it!

  206. Hello Angela,
    An interesting article about an important topic and often neglected practice. I more often than not wear my safety shoes as required. My problem is that as they age and breakdown I’m loath to replace them as they have conformed themselves to my feet and are really quite comfortable! My current pair have a crack in them and I’ve tried twice to replace them but have not yet found a pair that work for me. Keep your feet safe!

  207. Hello Angela,
    An interesting article about an important topic and often neglected practice. I more often than not wear my safety shoes as required. My problem is that as they age and breakdown I’m loath to replace them as they have conformed themselves to my feet and are really quite comfortable! My current pair have a crack in them and I’ve tried twice to replace them but have not yet found a pair that work for me. Keep your feet safe!

  208. Hello Angela,
    An interesting article about an important topic and often neglected practice. I more often than not wear my safety shoes as required. My problem is that as they age and breakdown I’m loath to replace them as they have conformed themselves to my feet and are really quite comfortable! My current pair have a crack in them and I’ve tried twice to replace them but have not yet found a pair that work for me. Keep your feet safe!

  209. Hello Angela,
    An interesting article about an important topic and often neglected practice. I more often than not wear my safety shoes as required. My problem is that as they age and breakdown I’m loath to replace them as they have conformed themselves to my feet and are really quite comfortable! My current pair have a crack in them and I’ve tried twice to replace them but have not yet found a pair that work for me. Keep your feet safe!

  210. Hello Angela,
    An interesting article about an important topic and often neglected practice. I more often than not wear my safety shoes as required. My problem is that as they age and breakdown I’m loath to replace them as they have conformed themselves to my feet and are really quite comfortable! My current pair have a crack in them and I’ve tried twice to replace them but have not yet found a pair that work for me. Keep your feet safe!

  211. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I am guilty of not wearing the footwear I should and I have yet to buy a pair of safety boots. Anything heavier than a pair of sandals make my feet feel like they are on fire! I do wear rubber boots for certain jobs. One problem Northern Collections Managers have is winter wear, winter boots, inside shoes, rubber boots for the snow melt in late winter. You have guilted me into safety boots though so I had better start hunting for a size 7!

  212. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I am guilty of not wearing the footwear I should and I have yet to buy a pair of safety boots. Anything heavier than a pair of sandals make my feet feel like they are on fire! I do wear rubber boots for certain jobs. One problem Northern Collections Managers have is winter wear, winter boots, inside shoes, rubber boots for the snow melt in late winter. You have guilted me into safety boots though so I had better start hunting for a size 7!

  213. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I am guilty of not wearing the footwear I should and I have yet to buy a pair of safety boots. Anything heavier than a pair of sandals make my feet feel like they are on fire! I do wear rubber boots for certain jobs. One problem Northern Collections Managers have is winter wear, winter boots, inside shoes, rubber boots for the snow melt in late winter. You have guilted me into safety boots though so I had better start hunting for a size 7!

  214. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I am guilty of not wearing the footwear I should and I have yet to buy a pair of safety boots. Anything heavier than a pair of sandals make my feet feel like they are on fire! I do wear rubber boots for certain jobs. One problem Northern Collections Managers have is winter wear, winter boots, inside shoes, rubber boots for the snow melt in late winter. You have guilted me into safety boots though so I had better start hunting for a size 7!

  215. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I am guilty of not wearing the footwear I should and I have yet to buy a pair of safety boots. Anything heavier than a pair of sandals make my feet feel like they are on fire! I do wear rubber boots for certain jobs. One problem Northern Collections Managers have is winter wear, winter boots, inside shoes, rubber boots for the snow melt in late winter. You have guilted me into safety boots though so I had better start hunting for a size 7!

  216. Janice Klein says:

    Wonderful article (but of course I already qualify as being more than reasonably interested in foot wear). In my first registrarial job I had one whole drawer of my desk devoted to shoes. While I haven’t struggled with finding work shoes, I did have to think very carefully about what I was wearing while working with a collection that had a major moth infestation (no wool – all synthetics!).

  217. Janice Klein says:

    Wonderful article (but of course I already qualify as being more than reasonably interested in foot wear). In my first registrarial job I had one whole drawer of my desk devoted to shoes. While I haven’t struggled with finding work shoes, I did have to think very carefully about what I was wearing while working with a collection that had a major moth infestation (no wool – all synthetics!).

  218. Janice Klein says:

    Wonderful article (but of course I already qualify as being more than reasonably interested in foot wear). In my first registrarial job I had one whole drawer of my desk devoted to shoes. While I haven’t struggled with finding work shoes, I did have to think very carefully about what I was wearing while working with a collection that had a major moth infestation (no wool – all synthetics!).

  219. Janice Klein says:

    Wonderful article (but of course I already qualify as being more than reasonably interested in foot wear). In my first registrarial job I had one whole drawer of my desk devoted to shoes. While I haven’t struggled with finding work shoes, I did have to think very carefully about what I was wearing while working with a collection that had a major moth infestation (no wool – all synthetics!).

  220. Janice Klein says:

    Wonderful article (but of course I already qualify as being more than reasonably interested in foot wear). In my first registrarial job I had one whole drawer of my desk devoted to shoes. While I haven’t struggled with finding work shoes, I did have to think very carefully about what I was wearing while working with a collection that had a major moth infestation (no wool – all synthetics!).

  221. Bryn Hyacinth says:

    You left out from the list museum managers who are told about the hazards but cant be bothered to inform themselves, too lazy to do anything, pretend an expertise they dont have, think it will be too expensive or will create bad publicity, thereby leaving their collections staff and volunteers at risk. Think that cant happen? Try working for a Local Authority run museum.

    • Angela says:

      I know it too good, Bryn, I know it too good. Sometimes a hint that this can become rather expensive if a former staffer, volunteer, visitor or researcher sues the museum can do something to get lazybones-in-chief to do something about it. Also, asking insurance questions can help.

    • Angela says:

      I know it too good, Bryn, I know it too good. Sometimes a hint that this can become rather expensive if a former staffer, volunteer, visitor or researcher sues the museum can do something to get lazybones-in-chief to do something about it. Also, asking insurance questions can help.

    • Angela says:

      I know it too good, Bryn, I know it too good. Sometimes a hint that this can become rather expensive if a former staffer, volunteer, visitor or researcher sues the museum can do something to get lazybones-in-chief to do something about it. Also, asking insurance questions can help.

    • Angela says:

      I know it too good, Bryn, I know it too good. Sometimes a hint that this can become rather expensive if a former staffer, volunteer, visitor or researcher sues the museum can do something to get lazybones-in-chief to do something about it. Also, asking insurance questions can help.

    • Angela says:

      I know it too good, Bryn, I know it too good. Sometimes a hint that this can become rather expensive if a former staffer, volunteer, visitor or researcher sues the museum can do something to get lazybones-in-chief to do something about it. Also, asking insurance questions can help.

  222. Bryn Hyacinth says:

    You left out from the list museum managers who are told about the hazards but cant be bothered to inform themselves, too lazy to do anything, pretend an expertise they dont have, think it will be too expensive or will create bad publicity, thereby leaving their collections staff and volunteers at risk. Think that cant happen? Try working for a Local Authority run museum.

  223. Bryn Hyacinth says:

    You left out from the list museum managers who are told about the hazards but cant be bothered to inform themselves, too lazy to do anything, pretend an expertise they dont have, think it will be too expensive or will create bad publicity, thereby leaving their collections staff and volunteers at risk. Think that cant happen? Try working for a Local Authority run museum.

  224. Bryn Hyacinth says:

    You left out from the list museum managers who are told about the hazards but cant be bothered to inform themselves, too lazy to do anything, pretend an expertise they dont have, think it will be too expensive or will create bad publicity, thereby leaving their collections staff and volunteers at risk. Think that cant happen? Try working for a Local Authority run museum.

  225. Bryn Hyacinth says:

    You left out from the list museum managers who are told about the hazards but cant be bothered to inform themselves, too lazy to do anything, pretend an expertise they dont have, think it will be too expensive or will create bad publicity, thereby leaving their collections staff and volunteers at risk. Think that cant happen? Try working for a Local Authority run museum.

  226. Helen Kindt says:

    A load of information, that hadn’t been thought of before by us. Thank you for this, will be re-thinking cataloguing process.

  227. Helen Kindt says:

    A load of information, that hadn’t been thought of before by us. Thank you for this, will be re-thinking cataloguing process.

  228. Helen Kindt says:

    A load of information, that hadn’t been thought of before by us. Thank you for this, will be re-thinking cataloguing process.

  229. Helen Kindt says:

    A load of information, that hadn’t been thought of before by us. Thank you for this, will be re-thinking cataloguing process.

  230. Helen Kindt says:

    A load of information, that hadn’t been thought of before by us. Thank you for this, will be re-thinking cataloguing process.

  231. Robert Cooke says:

    Working with the conservation of period furniture on a regular basis I am always aware of the possible presence of leaking mercury in pre 1900 mirrors. For those interested, information can be found on the following website http://www:conservation-wiki.com/wiki/Tin-Mercury_Amalgam_Mirrors#Preventative_Conservation

    • Angela says:

      Thanks for the hint, Robert. Indeed this is a huge issue especially for historic houses and castles.

    • Angela says:

      Thanks for the hint, Robert. Indeed this is a huge issue especially for historic houses and castles.

    • Angela says:

      Thanks for the hint, Robert. Indeed this is a huge issue especially for historic houses and castles.

    • Angela says:

      Thanks for the hint, Robert. Indeed this is a huge issue especially for historic houses and castles.

    • Angela says:

      Thanks for the hint, Robert. Indeed this is a huge issue especially for historic houses and castles.

    • Bryn Hyacinth says:

      I once found a puddle of mercury splashed onto a layer of tissue packing in a crate where it had been left without a lid at the bottom of a shelving unit. It was a completly inexplicable how it had got there or what object it might have come from. This may explain the mysterious source.

    • Bryn Hyacinth says:

      I once found a puddle of mercury splashed onto a layer of tissue packing in a crate where it had been left without a lid at the bottom of a shelving unit. It was a completly inexplicable how it had got there or what object it might have come from. This may explain the mysterious source.

    • Bryn Hyacinth says:

      I once found a puddle of mercury splashed onto a layer of tissue packing in a crate where it had been left without a lid at the bottom of a shelving unit. It was a completly inexplicable how it had got there or what object it might have come from. This may explain the mysterious source.

    • Bryn Hyacinth says:

      I once found a puddle of mercury splashed onto a layer of tissue packing in a crate where it had been left without a lid at the bottom of a shelving unit. It was a completly inexplicable how it had got there or what object it might have come from. This may explain the mysterious source.

    • Bryn Hyacinth says:

      I once found a puddle of mercury splashed onto a layer of tissue packing in a crate where it had been left without a lid at the bottom of a shelving unit. It was a completly inexplicable how it had got there or what object it might have come from. This may explain the mysterious source.

  232. Robert Cooke says:

    Working with the conservation of period furniture on a regular basis I am always aware of the possible presence of leaking mercury in pre 1900 mirrors. For those interested, information can be found on the following website http://www:conservation-wiki.com/wiki/Tin-Mercury_Amalgam_Mirrors#Preventative_Conservation

  233. Robert Cooke says:

    Working with the conservation of period furniture on a regular basis I am always aware of the possible presence of leaking mercury in pre 1900 mirrors. For those interested, information can be found on the following website http://www:conservation-wiki.com/wiki/Tin-Mercury_Amalgam_Mirrors#Preventative_Conservation

  234. Robert Cooke says:

    Working with the conservation of period furniture on a regular basis I am always aware of the possible presence of leaking mercury in pre 1900 mirrors. For those interested, information can be found on the following website http://www:conservation-wiki.com/wiki/Tin-Mercury_Amalgam_Mirrors#Preventative_Conservation

  235. Robert Cooke says:

    Working with the conservation of period furniture on a regular basis I am always aware of the possible presence of leaking mercury in pre 1900 mirrors. For those interested, information can be found on the following website http://www:conservation-wiki.com/wiki/Tin-Mercury_Amalgam_Mirrors#Preventative_Conservation

  236. Thanks for this valuable information. Will keep in mind this info. for my museum.

  237. Thanks for this valuable information. Will keep in mind this info. for my museum.

  238. Thanks for this valuable information. Will keep in mind this info. for my museum.

  239. Thanks for this valuable information. Will keep in mind this info. for my museum.

  240. Thanks for this valuable information. Will keep in mind this info. for my museum.

  241. Vehanush Punarjyan says:

    Very useful, thank you!!! Sometimes we need written material to prove we don’t ask for fantastic things.

  242. Vehanush Punarjyan says:

    Very useful, thank you!!! Sometimes we need written material to prove we don’t ask for fantastic things.

  243. Vehanush Punarjyan says:

    Very useful, thank you!!! Sometimes we need written material to prove we don’t ask for fantastic things.

  244. Vehanush Punarjyan says:

    Very useful, thank you!!! Sometimes we need written material to prove we don’t ask for fantastic things.

  245. Vehanush Punarjyan says:

    Very useful, thank you!!! Sometimes we need written material to prove we don’t ask for fantastic things.

  246. Elana Benamy says:

    Mercuric chloride was also commonly used as a pesticide on botanical specimens in herbaria in the past. Treated sheets were rarely labeled so.

    • Angela says:

      Good point, Elana! That’s why one should always assume they are treated unless proven otherwise.

    • Angela says:

      Good point, Elana! That’s why one should always assume they are treated unless proven otherwise.

    • Angela says:

      Good point, Elana! That’s why one should always assume they are treated unless proven otherwise.

    • Angela says:

      Good point, Elana! That’s why one should always assume they are treated unless proven otherwise.

    • Angela says:

      Good point, Elana! That’s why one should always assume they are treated unless proven otherwise.

  247. Elana Benamy says:

    Mercuric chloride was also commonly used as a pesticide on botanical specimens in herbaria in the past. Treated sheets were rarely labeled so.

  248. Elana Benamy says:

    Mercuric chloride was also commonly used as a pesticide on botanical specimens in herbaria in the past. Treated sheets were rarely labeled so.

  249. Elana Benamy says:

    Mercuric chloride was also commonly used as a pesticide on botanical specimens in herbaria in the past. Treated sheets were rarely labeled so.

  250. Elana Benamy says:

    Mercuric chloride was also commonly used as a pesticide on botanical specimens in herbaria in the past. Treated sheets were rarely labeled so.

  251. Jen Wicoff says:

    Excellent post, Angela! Sometimes I feel like a voice in the wilderness — I appreciate knowing I am not alone. 🙂

    • Angela says:

      It’s the purpose of this blog to share this stuff, so all those out in the trenches know they are not alone. 🙂

    • Angela says:

      It’s the purpose of this blog to share this stuff, so all those out in the trenches know they are not alone. 🙂

    • Angela says:

      It’s the purpose of this blog to share this stuff, so all those out in the trenches know they are not alone. 🙂

    • Angela says:

      It’s the purpose of this blog to share this stuff, so all those out in the trenches know they are not alone. 🙂

    • Angela says:

      It’s the purpose of this blog to share this stuff, so all those out in the trenches know they are not alone. 🙂

  252. Jen Wicoff says:

    Excellent post, Angela! Sometimes I feel like a voice in the wilderness — I appreciate knowing I am not alone. 🙂

  253. Jen Wicoff says:

    Excellent post, Angela! Sometimes I feel like a voice in the wilderness — I appreciate knowing I am not alone. 🙂

  254. Jen Wicoff says:

    Excellent post, Angela! Sometimes I feel like a voice in the wilderness — I appreciate knowing I am not alone. 🙂

  255. Jen Wicoff says:

    Excellent post, Angela! Sometimes I feel like a voice in the wilderness — I appreciate knowing I am not alone. 🙂

  256. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post and so true that we need to share information with each other and document document document

  257. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post and so true that we need to share information with each other and document document document

  258. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post and so true that we need to share information with each other and document document document

  259. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post and so true that we need to share information with each other and document document document

  260. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post and so true that we need to share information with each other and document document document

  261. So, so true! Now imagine that you are like me, I wear a size 4 shoe! Worse, my feet are short AND narrow, a phenomenon shoe manufacturers seem to deny even exists (double A’s widths often start at a size 7 shoe length. Not only is it as hard as Janice says to find an appropriate shoe that can take you from walking miles of conference site halls by day to dancing at night, imagine that you can only fit into 2% of all the shoes you ever see! Thank goodness that kid shoes are getting quite sophisticated (sad for the kids though) but comfort along with style are still very hard to come by!

  262. So, so true! Now imagine that you are like me, I wear a size 4 shoe! Worse, my feet are short AND narrow, a phenomenon shoe manufacturers seem to deny even exists (double A’s widths often start at a size 7 shoe length. Not only is it as hard as Janice says to find an appropriate shoe that can take you from walking miles of conference site halls by day to dancing at night, imagine that you can only fit into 2% of all the shoes you ever see! Thank goodness that kid shoes are getting quite sophisticated (sad for the kids though) but comfort along with style are still very hard to come by!

  263. So, so true! Now imagine that you are like me, I wear a size 4 shoe! Worse, my feet are short AND narrow, a phenomenon shoe manufacturers seem to deny even exists (double A’s widths often start at a size 7 shoe length. Not only is it as hard as Janice says to find an appropriate shoe that can take you from walking miles of conference site halls by day to dancing at night, imagine that you can only fit into 2% of all the shoes you ever see! Thank goodness that kid shoes are getting quite sophisticated (sad for the kids though) but comfort along with style are still very hard to come by!

  264. So, so true! Now imagine that you are like me, I wear a size 4 shoe! Worse, my feet are short AND narrow, a phenomenon shoe manufacturers seem to deny even exists (double A’s widths often start at a size 7 shoe length. Not only is it as hard as Janice says to find an appropriate shoe that can take you from walking miles of conference site halls by day to dancing at night, imagine that you can only fit into 2% of all the shoes you ever see! Thank goodness that kid shoes are getting quite sophisticated (sad for the kids though) but comfort along with style are still very hard to come by!

  265. So, so true! Now imagine that you are like me, I wear a size 4 shoe! Worse, my feet are short AND narrow, a phenomenon shoe manufacturers seem to deny even exists (double A’s widths often start at a size 7 shoe length. Not only is it as hard as Janice says to find an appropriate shoe that can take you from walking miles of conference site halls by day to dancing at night, imagine that you can only fit into 2% of all the shoes you ever see! Thank goodness that kid shoes are getting quite sophisticated (sad for the kids though) but comfort along with style are still very hard to come by!

  266. Thanks for this reminder. Very important to keep this in mind.

  267. Thanks for this reminder. Very important to keep this in mind.

  268. Thanks for this reminder. Very important to keep this in mind.

  269. Thanks for this reminder. Very important to keep this in mind.

  270. Thanks for this reminder. Very important to keep this in mind.

  271. Great advice. When staff bring kettles, toasters, and so on to work they seldom (if ever) bring in the newest leaving older ones with faulty power cords at home! All of these should be properly inspected by a qualified electrician before being allow in a collection housing building.

  272. Great advice. When staff bring kettles, toasters, and so on to work they seldom (if ever) bring in the newest leaving older ones with faulty power cords at home! All of these should be properly inspected by a qualified electrician before being allow in a collection housing building.

  273. Great advice. When staff bring kettles, toasters, and so on to work they seldom (if ever) bring in the newest leaving older ones with faulty power cords at home! All of these should be properly inspected by a qualified electrician before being allow in a collection housing building.

  274. Great advice. When staff bring kettles, toasters, and so on to work they seldom (if ever) bring in the newest leaving older ones with faulty power cords at home! All of these should be properly inspected by a qualified electrician before being allow in a collection housing building.

  275. Great advice. When staff bring kettles, toasters, and so on to work they seldom (if ever) bring in the newest leaving older ones with faulty power cords at home! All of these should be properly inspected by a qualified electrician before being allow in a collection housing building.

  276. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great idea!

  277. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great idea!

  278. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great idea!

  279. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great idea!

  280. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great idea!

  281. Rebecca Rose says:

    I LOVE your remark….”It seems no one ever has the 30 seconds for changing a location, but always the hours for searching!” So True. That fits many other scenarios…do it right and completely the first time, if possible to save a lot of extra work later!

  282. Rebecca Rose says:

    I LOVE your remark….”It seems no one ever has the 30 seconds for changing a location, but always the hours for searching!” So True. That fits many other scenarios…do it right and completely the first time, if possible to save a lot of extra work later!

  283. Rebecca Rose says:

    I LOVE your remark….”It seems no one ever has the 30 seconds for changing a location, but always the hours for searching!” So True. That fits many other scenarios…do it right and completely the first time, if possible to save a lot of extra work later!

  284. Rebecca Rose says:

    I LOVE your remark….”It seems no one ever has the 30 seconds for changing a location, but always the hours for searching!” So True. That fits many other scenarios…do it right and completely the first time, if possible to save a lot of extra work later!

  285. Rebecca Rose says:

    I LOVE your remark….”It seems no one ever has the 30 seconds for changing a location, but always the hours for searching!” So True. That fits many other scenarios…do it right and completely the first time, if possible to save a lot of extra work later!

  286. Rachel Farkas says:

    The satisfaction of completing each of these small steps! Sounds like a good month to me!

  287. Rachel Farkas says:

    The satisfaction of completing each of these small steps! Sounds like a good month to me!

  288. Rachel Farkas says:

    The satisfaction of completing each of these small steps! Sounds like a good month to me!

  289. Rachel Farkas says:

    The satisfaction of completing each of these small steps! Sounds like a good month to me!

  290. Rachel Farkas says:

    The satisfaction of completing each of these small steps! Sounds like a good month to me!

  291. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post, I love hearing about the day to day activities. Makes us feel less alone. I also keep like objects together as it makes it easier to search for missing items.

  292. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post, I love hearing about the day to day activities. Makes us feel less alone. I also keep like objects together as it makes it easier to search for missing items.

  293. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post, I love hearing about the day to day activities. Makes us feel less alone. I also keep like objects together as it makes it easier to search for missing items.

  294. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post, I love hearing about the day to day activities. Makes us feel less alone. I also keep like objects together as it makes it easier to search for missing items.

  295. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Great post, I love hearing about the day to day activities. Makes us feel less alone. I also keep like objects together as it makes it easier to search for missing items.

  296. Susanne Nickel says:

    This topic might be of interest for ICOMS international committee for Collecting and Collections COMCOL. I recommend to take contact with them for further discussion. They may have strategies to deal with this because they have many specialist in documenting the present. For more information an contact details see here: http://network.icom.museum/comcol/who-we-are/board-members

  297. Susanne Nickel says:

    This topic might be of interest for ICOMS international committee for Collecting and Collections COMCOL. I recommend to take contact with them for further discussion. They may have strategies to deal with this because they have many specialist in documenting the present. For more information an contact details see here: http://network.icom.museum/comcol/who-we-are/board-members

  298. Susanne Nickel says:

    This topic might be of interest for ICOMS international committee for Collecting and Collections COMCOL. I recommend to take contact with them for further discussion. They may have strategies to deal with this because they have many specialist in documenting the present. For more information an contact details see here: http://network.icom.museum/comcol/who-we-are/board-members

  299. Susanne Nickel says:

    This topic might be of interest for ICOMS international committee for Collecting and Collections COMCOL. I recommend to take contact with them for further discussion. They may have strategies to deal with this because they have many specialist in documenting the present. For more information an contact details see here: http://network.icom.museum/comcol/who-we-are/board-members

  300. Susanne Nickel says:

    This topic might be of interest for ICOMS international committee for Collecting and Collections COMCOL. I recommend to take contact with them for further discussion. They may have strategies to deal with this because they have many specialist in documenting the present. For more information an contact details see here: http://network.icom.museum/comcol/who-we-are/board-members

  301. Amanda Robinson says:

    Thank you, Kathleen, for your post. It is not only timely, but even in just the past sixteen years within the US, rapid response collecting seems to be becoming more of a reality for many of our colleagues not previously exposed to such professional experiences (I am thinking about organizations such as the Orange County Regional History Center that has been tasked with collecting and preserving items from the memorials, etc., created in response to the Pulse Night Club shooting). I agree that some clarification on how museums, and other similar institutions, respond or react to such events is, or should be, dictated by having a clear mission and a collecting policy. There might also be a whole separate web of complications to consider, such as museums learning how to navigate the sensitive and emotional cloud that can surround such tragic and devastating events. How do we express the arguable importance of rapid response collecting to individuals or organizations directly affected by such tragedies without seeming to minimize their feelings and experiences? I think this would be a very valuable topic to share or discuss at an upcoming conference or workshop. I know I would find the conversation invaluable, and in our changing and growing world,many others may, as well.

  302. Amanda Robinson says:

    Thank you, Kathleen, for your post. It is not only timely, but even in just the past sixteen years within the US, rapid response collecting seems to be becoming more of a reality for many of our colleagues not previously exposed to such professional experiences (I am thinking about organizations such as the Orange County Regional History Center that has been tasked with collecting and preserving items from the memorials, etc., created in response to the Pulse Night Club shooting). I agree that some clarification on how museums, and other similar institutions, respond or react to such events is, or should be, dictated by having a clear mission and a collecting policy. There might also be a whole separate web of complications to consider, such as museums learning how to navigate the sensitive and emotional cloud that can surround such tragic and devastating events. How do we express the arguable importance of rapid response collecting to individuals or organizations directly affected by such tragedies without seeming to minimize their feelings and experiences? I think this would be a very valuable topic to share or discuss at an upcoming conference or workshop. I know I would find the conversation invaluable, and in our changing and growing world,many others may, as well.

  303. Amanda Robinson says:

    Thank you, Kathleen, for your post. It is not only timely, but even in just the past sixteen years within the US, rapid response collecting seems to be becoming more of a reality for many of our colleagues not previously exposed to such professional experiences (I am thinking about organizations such as the Orange County Regional History Center that has been tasked with collecting and preserving items from the memorials, etc., created in response to the Pulse Night Club shooting). I agree that some clarification on how museums, and other similar institutions, respond or react to such events is, or should be, dictated by having a clear mission and a collecting policy. There might also be a whole separate web of complications to consider, such as museums learning how to navigate the sensitive and emotional cloud that can surround such tragic and devastating events. How do we express the arguable importance of rapid response collecting to individuals or organizations directly affected by such tragedies without seeming to minimize their feelings and experiences? I think this would be a very valuable topic to share or discuss at an upcoming conference or workshop. I know I would find the conversation invaluable, and in our changing and growing world,many others may, as well.

  304. Amanda Robinson says:

    Thank you, Kathleen, for your post. It is not only timely, but even in just the past sixteen years within the US, rapid response collecting seems to be becoming more of a reality for many of our colleagues not previously exposed to such professional experiences (I am thinking about organizations such as the Orange County Regional History Center that has been tasked with collecting and preserving items from the memorials, etc., created in response to the Pulse Night Club shooting). I agree that some clarification on how museums, and other similar institutions, respond or react to such events is, or should be, dictated by having a clear mission and a collecting policy. There might also be a whole separate web of complications to consider, such as museums learning how to navigate the sensitive and emotional cloud that can surround such tragic and devastating events. How do we express the arguable importance of rapid response collecting to individuals or organizations directly affected by such tragedies without seeming to minimize their feelings and experiences? I think this would be a very valuable topic to share or discuss at an upcoming conference or workshop. I know I would find the conversation invaluable, and in our changing and growing world,many others may, as well.

  305. Amanda Robinson says:

    Thank you, Kathleen, for your post. It is not only timely, but even in just the past sixteen years within the US, rapid response collecting seems to be becoming more of a reality for many of our colleagues not previously exposed to such professional experiences (I am thinking about organizations such as the Orange County Regional History Center that has been tasked with collecting and preserving items from the memorials, etc., created in response to the Pulse Night Club shooting). I agree that some clarification on how museums, and other similar institutions, respond or react to such events is, or should be, dictated by having a clear mission and a collecting policy. There might also be a whole separate web of complications to consider, such as museums learning how to navigate the sensitive and emotional cloud that can surround such tragic and devastating events. How do we express the arguable importance of rapid response collecting to individuals or organizations directly affected by such tragedies without seeming to minimize their feelings and experiences? I think this would be a very valuable topic to share or discuss at an upcoming conference or workshop. I know I would find the conversation invaluable, and in our changing and growing world,many others may, as well.

  306. Anne T. Lane says:

    And then there was the large 19th c. ceramic jug we were trying to identify. As I went to turn it over to view the bottom, we heard a bit of rustling. “Sounds as if there’s something inside,” I said. I up-ended it and out fell a wad of dust with bits of straw ane other detritus, along with a thoroughly mummified mouse. This was no canopic jar, and we are not a natural history museum, so I deaccessioned the wee corpse and chucked it in the trash.

  307. Anne T. Lane says:

    And then there was the large 19th c. ceramic jug we were trying to identify. As I went to turn it over to view the bottom, we heard a bit of rustling. “Sounds as if there’s something inside,” I said. I up-ended it and out fell a wad of dust with bits of straw ane other detritus, along with a thoroughly mummified mouse. This was no canopic jar, and we are not a natural history museum, so I deaccessioned the wee corpse and chucked it in the trash.

  308. Anne T. Lane says:

    And then there was the large 19th c. ceramic jug we were trying to identify. As I went to turn it over to view the bottom, we heard a bit of rustling. “Sounds as if there’s something inside,” I said. I up-ended it and out fell a wad of dust with bits of straw ane other detritus, along with a thoroughly mummified mouse. This was no canopic jar, and we are not a natural history museum, so I deaccessioned the wee corpse and chucked it in the trash.

  309. Anne T. Lane says:

    And then there was the large 19th c. ceramic jug we were trying to identify. As I went to turn it over to view the bottom, we heard a bit of rustling. “Sounds as if there’s something inside,” I said. I up-ended it and out fell a wad of dust with bits of straw ane other detritus, along with a thoroughly mummified mouse. This was no canopic jar, and we are not a natural history museum, so I deaccessioned the wee corpse and chucked it in the trash.

  310. Anne T. Lane says:

    And then there was the large 19th c. ceramic jug we were trying to identify. As I went to turn it over to view the bottom, we heard a bit of rustling. “Sounds as if there’s something inside,” I said. I up-ended it and out fell a wad of dust with bits of straw ane other detritus, along with a thoroughly mummified mouse. This was no canopic jar, and we are not a natural history museum, so I deaccessioned the wee corpse and chucked it in the trash.

  311. Rachel Farkas says:

    The idea of rapid response collecting does not only have applications to protests and marches but also tragic events. In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, local museums and other institutions came together to try to decide how to best preserve the materials that were left behind as memorials to the events. How do you decide which institution should preserve these materials? Should they be shared across many institutions or kept at one site where visitors will know how to best access the collection? This post definitely poses a good question. Give the current climate, its best for museums to determine their role in advance. Thank you!

  312. Rachel Farkas says:

    The idea of rapid response collecting does not only have applications to protests and marches but also tragic events. In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, local museums and other institutions came together to try to decide how to best preserve the materials that were left behind as memorials to the events. How do you decide which institution should preserve these materials? Should they be shared across many institutions or kept at one site where visitors will know how to best access the collection? This post definitely poses a good question. Give the current climate, its best for museums to determine their role in advance. Thank you!

  313. Rachel Farkas says:

    The idea of rapid response collecting does not only have applications to protests and marches but also tragic events. In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, local museums and other institutions came together to try to decide how to best preserve the materials that were left behind as memorials to the events. How do you decide which institution should preserve these materials? Should they be shared across many institutions or kept at one site where visitors will know how to best access the collection? This post definitely poses a good question. Give the current climate, its best for museums to determine their role in advance. Thank you!

  314. Rachel Farkas says:

    The idea of rapid response collecting does not only have applications to protests and marches but also tragic events. In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, local museums and other institutions came together to try to decide how to best preserve the materials that were left behind as memorials to the events. How do you decide which institution should preserve these materials? Should they be shared across many institutions or kept at one site where visitors will know how to best access the collection? This post definitely poses a good question. Give the current climate, its best for museums to determine their role in advance. Thank you!

  315. Rachel Farkas says:

    The idea of rapid response collecting does not only have applications to protests and marches but also tragic events. In the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombings, local museums and other institutions came together to try to decide how to best preserve the materials that were left behind as memorials to the events. How do you decide which institution should preserve these materials? Should they be shared across many institutions or kept at one site where visitors will know how to best access the collection? This post definitely poses a good question. Give the current climate, its best for museums to determine their role in advance. Thank you!

  316. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I one hundred percent agree. Museums should not be involved in rapid on the spot collecting and I don’t know of any collections policy that allows for this. Ethically, if we have a policy we have to adhere to it. Also I agree that museums should be detached and neutral at these events and individuals should not act as if they represent their museum as a whole. Personal politics should be left as personal politics. How are to judge that what happened a week ago is really that earthshattering without at least by distancing ourselves from that event by time so we can compare it as a whole to what is going on.

  317. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I one hundred percent agree. Museums should not be involved in rapid on the spot collecting and I don’t know of any collections policy that allows for this. Ethically, if we have a policy we have to adhere to it. Also I agree that museums should be detached and neutral at these events and individuals should not act as if they represent their museum as a whole. Personal politics should be left as personal politics. How are to judge that what happened a week ago is really that earthshattering without at least by distancing ourselves from that event by time so we can compare it as a whole to what is going on.

  318. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I one hundred percent agree. Museums should not be involved in rapid on the spot collecting and I don’t know of any collections policy that allows for this. Ethically, if we have a policy we have to adhere to it. Also I agree that museums should be detached and neutral at these events and individuals should not act as if they represent their museum as a whole. Personal politics should be left as personal politics. How are to judge that what happened a week ago is really that earthshattering without at least by distancing ourselves from that event by time so we can compare it as a whole to what is going on.

  319. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I one hundred percent agree. Museums should not be involved in rapid on the spot collecting and I don’t know of any collections policy that allows for this. Ethically, if we have a policy we have to adhere to it. Also I agree that museums should be detached and neutral at these events and individuals should not act as if they represent their museum as a whole. Personal politics should be left as personal politics. How are to judge that what happened a week ago is really that earthshattering without at least by distancing ourselves from that event by time so we can compare it as a whole to what is going on.

  320. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I one hundred percent agree. Museums should not be involved in rapid on the spot collecting and I don’t know of any collections policy that allows for this. Ethically, if we have a policy we have to adhere to it. Also I agree that museums should be detached and neutral at these events and individuals should not act as if they represent their museum as a whole. Personal politics should be left as personal politics. How are to judge that what happened a week ago is really that earthshattering without at least by distancing ourselves from that event by time so we can compare it as a whole to what is going on.

  321. Luis Guillermo Vasquez says:

    Congratulations, Registrar Trek team. Thanks so much for the excellent input in the field!

  322. Luis Guillermo Vasquez says:

    Congratulations, Registrar Trek team. Thanks so much for the excellent input in the field!

  323. Luis Guillermo Vasquez says:

    Congratulations, Registrar Trek team. Thanks so much for the excellent input in the field!

  324. Luis Guillermo Vasquez says:

    Congratulations, Registrar Trek team. Thanks so much for the excellent input in the field!

  325. Luis Guillermo Vasquez says:

    Congratulations, Registrar Trek team. Thanks so much for the excellent input in the field!

  326. Pei Qi Tan says:

    Interesting post and it definitely reflects my thoughts as well. I often face the same issue at work where the different groups of specialists work in their own group, not realizing that others are working on related topics. It is a waste as I believe a topic will be much more interesting when it is being presented from various angles. 🙂

  327. Pei Qi Tan says:

    Interesting post and it definitely reflects my thoughts as well. I often face the same issue at work where the different groups of specialists work in their own group, not realizing that others are working on related topics. It is a waste as I believe a topic will be much more interesting when it is being presented from various angles. 🙂

  328. Pei Qi Tan says:

    Interesting post and it definitely reflects my thoughts as well. I often face the same issue at work where the different groups of specialists work in their own group, not realizing that others are working on related topics. It is a waste as I believe a topic will be much more interesting when it is being presented from various angles. 🙂

  329. Pei Qi Tan says:

    Interesting post and it definitely reflects my thoughts as well. I often face the same issue at work where the different groups of specialists work in their own group, not realizing that others are working on related topics. It is a waste as I believe a topic will be much more interesting when it is being presented from various angles. 🙂

  330. Pei Qi Tan says:

    Interesting post and it definitely reflects my thoughts as well. I often face the same issue at work where the different groups of specialists work in their own group, not realizing that others are working on related topics. It is a waste as I believe a topic will be much more interesting when it is being presented from various angles. 🙂

  331. Barry Knight says:

    Dear Angela,
    I don’t think I can give a hard-and-fast answer to your questions, because a lot depends on factors such as the logging interval (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins?) and the space where the logger is installed. Is it physically possible for the RH to have increased by 5% in 10 mins? Or is it more likely that a passing member of staff blew on the sensor “to see if it was working”? If you have just one high reading (as you have in your graph above), I would be inclined to blame that, or just a momentary malfunction of the logger – a glitch.
    Regards,
    Barry

  332. Barry Knight says:

    Dear Angela,
    I don’t think I can give a hard-and-fast answer to your questions, because a lot depends on factors such as the logging interval (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins?) and the space where the logger is installed. Is it physically possible for the RH to have increased by 5% in 10 mins? Or is it more likely that a passing member of staff blew on the sensor “to see if it was working”? If you have just one high reading (as you have in your graph above), I would be inclined to blame that, or just a momentary malfunction of the logger – a glitch.
    Regards,
    Barry

  333. Barry Knight says:

    Dear Angela,
    I don’t think I can give a hard-and-fast answer to your questions, because a lot depends on factors such as the logging interval (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins?) and the space where the logger is installed. Is it physically possible for the RH to have increased by 5% in 10 mins? Or is it more likely that a passing member of staff blew on the sensor “to see if it was working”? If you have just one high reading (as you have in your graph above), I would be inclined to blame that, or just a momentary malfunction of the logger – a glitch.
    Regards,
    Barry

  334. Barry Knight says:

    Dear Angela,
    I don’t think I can give a hard-and-fast answer to your questions, because a lot depends on factors such as the logging interval (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins?) and the space where the logger is installed. Is it physically possible for the RH to have increased by 5% in 10 mins? Or is it more likely that a passing member of staff blew on the sensor “to see if it was working”? If you have just one high reading (as you have in your graph above), I would be inclined to blame that, or just a momentary malfunction of the logger – a glitch.
    Regards,
    Barry

  335. Barry Knight says:

    Dear Angela,
    I don’t think I can give a hard-and-fast answer to your questions, because a lot depends on factors such as the logging interval (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins?) and the space where the logger is installed. Is it physically possible for the RH to have increased by 5% in 10 mins? Or is it more likely that a passing member of staff blew on the sensor “to see if it was working”? If you have just one high reading (as you have in your graph above), I would be inclined to blame that, or just a momentary malfunction of the logger – a glitch.
    Regards,
    Barry

  336. Katie Prichard says:

    I’d also like to add that some of our museums are closed between the holidays so we lose out on valuable work-time.

  337. Katie Prichard says:

    I’d also like to add that some of our museums are closed between the holidays so we lose out on valuable work-time.

  338. Katie Prichard says:

    I’d also like to add that some of our museums are closed between the holidays so we lose out on valuable work-time.

  339. Katie Prichard says:

    I’d also like to add that some of our museums are closed between the holidays so we lose out on valuable work-time.

  340. Katie Prichard says:

    I’d also like to add that some of our museums are closed between the holidays so we lose out on valuable work-time.

  341. Janice Klein says:

    Once again, Angela, you have provided a clear, funny analysis of why this is our busy season! It’s a terrific explanation that every registrar and collections manager out there can provide to their bosses.

  342. Janice Klein says:

    Once again, Angela, you have provided a clear, funny analysis of why this is our busy season! It’s a terrific explanation that every registrar and collections manager out there can provide to their bosses.

  343. Janice Klein says:

    Once again, Angela, you have provided a clear, funny analysis of why this is our busy season! It’s a terrific explanation that every registrar and collections manager out there can provide to their bosses.

  344. Janice Klein says:

    Once again, Angela, you have provided a clear, funny analysis of why this is our busy season! It’s a terrific explanation that every registrar and collections manager out there can provide to their bosses.

  345. Janice Klein says:

    Once again, Angela, you have provided a clear, funny analysis of why this is our busy season! It’s a terrific explanation that every registrar and collections manager out there can provide to their bosses.

  346. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said!

  347. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said!

  348. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said!

  349. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said!

  350. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said!

  351. Maria de Lourdes Horta says:

    Very good text and proposition… Maybe at the next General Conference we Will have MCMs… Multiple Competences Meetings…or “committees”…

  352. Maria de Lourdes Horta says:

    Very good text and proposition… Maybe at the next General Conference we Will have MCMs… Multiple Competences Meetings…or “committees”…

  353. Maria de Lourdes Horta says:

    Very good text and proposition… Maybe at the next General Conference we Will have MCMs… Multiple Competences Meetings…or “committees”…

  354. Maria de Lourdes Horta says:

    Very good text and proposition… Maybe at the next General Conference we Will have MCMs… Multiple Competences Meetings…or “committees”…

  355. Maria de Lourdes Horta says:

    Very good text and proposition… Maybe at the next General Conference we Will have MCMs… Multiple Competences Meetings…or “committees”…

  356. Leontine Meijer-van Mensch says:

    Interesting discussion, needs to be continued!

  357. Leontine Meijer-van Mensch says:

    Interesting discussion, needs to be continued!

  358. Leontine Meijer-van Mensch says:

    Interesting discussion, needs to be continued!

  359. Leontine Meijer-van Mensch says:

    Interesting discussion, needs to be continued!

  360. Leontine Meijer-van Mensch says:

    Interesting discussion, needs to be continued!

  361. […] 6 October 2016: reference to Angela Kipp’s account of the conference added in second paragraph. (And see now – 31 October 2016 – her further thoughts.) […]

  362. […] 6 October 2016: reference to Angela Kipp’s account of the conference added in second paragraph. (And see now – 31 October 2016 – her further thoughts.) […]

  363. […] 6 October 2016: reference to Angela Kipp’s account of the conference added in second paragraph. (And see now – 31 October 2016 – her further thoughts.) […]

  364. […] 6 October 2016: reference to Angela Kipp’s account of the conference added in second paragraph. (And see now – 31 October 2016 – her further thoughts.) […]

  365. […] 6 October 2016: reference to Angela Kipp’s account of the conference added in second paragraph. (And see now – 31 October 2016 – her further thoughts.) […]

  366. Nathalie Guénette says:

    Very interesting reflection. You are right that we need to be more involved with different groups so we can show them how we can help them.

  367. Nathalie Guénette says:

    Very interesting reflection. You are right that we need to be more involved with different groups so we can show them how we can help them.

  368. Nathalie Guénette says:

    Very interesting reflection. You are right that we need to be more involved with different groups so we can show them how we can help them.

  369. Nathalie Guénette says:

    Very interesting reflection. You are right that we need to be more involved with different groups so we can show them how we can help them.

  370. Nathalie Guénette says:

    Very interesting reflection. You are right that we need to be more involved with different groups so we can show them how we can help them.

  371. Sheila Perry says:

    Very interesting – we see this a lot in our own organisation, with people pursuing their own course of action, apparently oblivious to developments in other areas until the paths are forced to intersect.
    (Also, I have a similar picture taken from a train window as I shuttled through Sweden – by the time I clicked the button the thing I really wanted to photograph was out of sight, which could well be another metaphor)

    • Angela says:

      Exactly! And interesting metaphor of trying to capture things that are already out of sight… Kind of what a museum tries to do…

    • Angela says:

      Exactly! And interesting metaphor of trying to capture things that are already out of sight… Kind of what a museum tries to do…

    • Angela says:

      Exactly! And interesting metaphor of trying to capture things that are already out of sight… Kind of what a museum tries to do…

    • Angela says:

      Exactly! And interesting metaphor of trying to capture things that are already out of sight… Kind of what a museum tries to do…

    • Angela says:

      Exactly! And interesting metaphor of trying to capture things that are already out of sight… Kind of what a museum tries to do…

  372. Sheila Perry says:

    Very interesting – we see this a lot in our own organisation, with people pursuing their own course of action, apparently oblivious to developments in other areas until the paths are forced to intersect.
    (Also, I have a similar picture taken from a train window as I shuttled through Sweden – by the time I clicked the button the thing I really wanted to photograph was out of sight, which could well be another metaphor)

  373. Sheila Perry says:

    Very interesting – we see this a lot in our own organisation, with people pursuing their own course of action, apparently oblivious to developments in other areas until the paths are forced to intersect.
    (Also, I have a similar picture taken from a train window as I shuttled through Sweden – by the time I clicked the button the thing I really wanted to photograph was out of sight, which could well be another metaphor)

  374. Sheila Perry says:

    Very interesting – we see this a lot in our own organisation, with people pursuing their own course of action, apparently oblivious to developments in other areas until the paths are forced to intersect.
    (Also, I have a similar picture taken from a train window as I shuttled through Sweden – by the time I clicked the button the thing I really wanted to photograph was out of sight, which could well be another metaphor)

  375. Sheila Perry says:

    Very interesting – we see this a lot in our own organisation, with people pursuing their own course of action, apparently oblivious to developments in other areas until the paths are forced to intersect.
    (Also, I have a similar picture taken from a train window as I shuttled through Sweden – by the time I clicked the button the thing I really wanted to photograph was out of sight, which could well be another metaphor)

  376. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said and hoping that is the direction more conferences will pursue

  377. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said and hoping that is the direction more conferences will pursue

  378. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said and hoping that is the direction more conferences will pursue

  379. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said and hoping that is the direction more conferences will pursue

  380. Evelyn Fidler says:

    Well said and hoping that is the direction more conferences will pursue

  381. […] was also an opportunity to meet colleagues, notably Angela, for whose Registrar Trek blog I wrote an article some years ago and with I whom I delivered my paper at this conference, but whom I only met for the […]

  382. […] was also an opportunity to meet colleagues, notably Angela, for whose Registrar Trek blog I wrote an article some years ago and with I whom I delivered my paper at this conference, but whom I only met for the […]

  383. […] was also an opportunity to meet colleagues, notably Angela, for whose Registrar Trek blog I wrote an article some years ago and with I whom I delivered my paper at this conference, but whom I only met for the […]

  384. […] was also an opportunity to meet colleagues, notably Angela, for whose Registrar Trek blog I wrote an article some years ago and with I whom I delivered my paper at this conference, but whom I only met for the […]

  385. […] was also an opportunity to meet colleagues, notably Angela, for whose Registrar Trek blog I wrote an article some years ago and with I whom I delivered my paper at this conference, but whom I only met for the […]

  386. […] the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of documentation. (And Angela has published her thoughts on the conference, too.2 […]

  387. […] the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of documentation. (And Angela has published her thoughts on the conference, too.2 […]

  388. […] the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of documentation. (And Angela has published her thoughts on the conference, too.2 […]

  389. […] the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of documentation. (And Angela has published her thoughts on the conference, too.2 […]

  390. […] the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of documentation. (And Angela has published her thoughts on the conference, too.2 […]

  391. […] con registradores” [publicado también en esta misma sección, en diciembre pasado], en http://world.museumsprojekte.de/?p=24, o de hacer un inventario a una determinada colección. Sin embargo, si una institución posee […]

  392. […] con registradores” [publicado también en esta misma sección, en diciembre pasado], en http://world.museumsprojekte.de/?p=24, o de hacer un inventario a una determinada colección. Sin embargo, si una institución posee […]

  393. […] con registradores” [publicado también en esta misma sección, en diciembre pasado], en http://world.museumsprojekte.de/?p=24, o de hacer un inventario a una determinada colección. Sin embargo, si una institución posee […]

  394. […] con registradores” [publicado también en esta misma sección, en diciembre pasado], en http://world.museumsprojekte.de/?p=24, o de hacer un inventario a una determinada colección. Sin embargo, si una institución posee […]

  395. […] con registradores” [publicado también en esta misma sección, en diciembre pasado], en http://world.museumsprojekte.de/?p=24, o de hacer un inventario a una determinada colección. Sin embargo, si una institución posee […]

  396. […] doing, and comparing experiences. This time, though, I also gave a brief paper,1 co-authored with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of […]

  397. […] doing, and comparing experiences. This time, though, I also gave a brief paper,1 co-authored with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of […]

  398. […] doing, and comparing experiences. This time, though, I also gave a brief paper,1 co-authored with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of […]

  399. […] doing, and comparing experiences. This time, though, I also gave a brief paper,1 co-authored with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of […]

  400. […] doing, and comparing experiences. This time, though, I also gave a brief paper,1 co-authored with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, about raising the profile of […]

  401. Isabelle Poulin says:

    I would like to know if I can purchase a copy of the pdf and make a copy for our Library collection?

    Thank you,

    Isabelle Poulin

  402. Isabelle Poulin says:

    I would like to know if I can purchase a copy of the pdf and make a copy for our Library collection?

    Thank you,

    Isabelle Poulin

  403. Isabelle Poulin says:

    I would like to know if I can purchase a copy of the pdf and make a copy for our Library collection?

    Thank you,

    Isabelle Poulin

  404. Isabelle Poulin says:

    I would like to know if I can purchase a copy of the pdf and make a copy for our Library collection?

    Thank you,

    Isabelle Poulin

  405. Isabelle Poulin says:

    I would like to know if I can purchase a copy of the pdf and make a copy for our Library collection?

    Thank you,

    Isabelle Poulin

  406. Evelyn Fidler says:

    How do we register to get your blog updates?

  407. Evelyn Fidler says:

    How do we register to get your blog updates?

  408. Evelyn Fidler says:

    How do we register to get your blog updates?

  409. Evelyn Fidler says:

    How do we register to get your blog updates?

  410. Evelyn Fidler says:

    How do we register to get your blog updates?

  411. Aurore T says:

    I’m doing my luggages for Abu Dhabi…More than 40°C outside, meeting rooms with AC…You can imagine the nightmare…;)

  412. Aurore T says:

    I’m doing my luggages for Abu Dhabi…More than 40°C outside, meeting rooms with AC…You can imagine the nightmare…;)

  413. Aurore T says:

    I’m doing my luggages for Abu Dhabi…More than 40°C outside, meeting rooms with AC…You can imagine the nightmare…;)

  414. Aurore T says:

    I’m doing my luggages for Abu Dhabi…More than 40°C outside, meeting rooms with AC…You can imagine the nightmare…;)

  415. Aurore T says:

    I’m doing my luggages for Abu Dhabi…More than 40°C outside, meeting rooms with AC…You can imagine the nightmare…;)

  416. Ruth says:

    Will the recipe and tasting notes go in the history file and what about re ordinary the dates they were eaten, or is that going too far

  417. Ruth says:

    Will the recipe and tasting notes go in the history file and what about re ordinary the dates they were eaten, or is that going too far

  418. Ruth says:

    Will the recipe and tasting notes go in the history file and what about re ordinary the dates they were eaten, or is that going too far

  419. Ruth says:

    Will the recipe and tasting notes go in the history file and what about re ordinary the dates they were eaten, or is that going too far

  420. Ruth says:

    Will the recipe and tasting notes go in the history file and what about re ordinary the dates they were eaten, or is that going too far

  421. Brent Powell says:

    I am so glad that people still use rhubarb. Nice labels as only one would expect!

  422. Brent Powell says:

    I am so glad that people still use rhubarb. Nice labels as only one would expect!

  423. Brent Powell says:

    I am so glad that people still use rhubarb. Nice labels as only one would expect!

  424. Brent Powell says:

    I am so glad that people still use rhubarb. Nice labels as only one would expect!

  425. Brent Powell says:

    I am so glad that people still use rhubarb. Nice labels as only one would expect!

  426. Evelyn Fidler says:

    great series, already signed up!

  427. Evelyn Fidler says:

    great series, already signed up!

  428. Evelyn Fidler says:

    great series, already signed up!

  429. Evelyn Fidler says:

    great series, already signed up!

  430. Evelyn Fidler says:

    great series, already signed up!

  431. Meagan Brooks says:

    You are so right. This has often been a source of more consternation for me than the paper I’m supposed to give!

  432. Meagan Brooks says:

    You are so right. This has often been a source of more consternation for me than the paper I’m supposed to give!

  433. Meagan Brooks says:

    You are so right. This has often been a source of more consternation for me than the paper I’m supposed to give!

  434. Meagan Brooks says:

    You are so right. This has often been a source of more consternation for me than the paper I’m supposed to give!

  435. Meagan Brooks says:

    You are so right. This has often been a source of more consternation for me than the paper I’m supposed to give!

  436. Janice, you are totally correct on all counts. Thank you for the down-to-earth distillation of an important topic.

  437. Janice, you are totally correct on all counts. Thank you for the down-to-earth distillation of an important topic.

  438. Janice, you are totally correct on all counts. Thank you for the down-to-earth distillation of an important topic.

  439. Janice, you are totally correct on all counts. Thank you for the down-to-earth distillation of an important topic.

  440. Janice, you are totally correct on all counts. Thank you for the down-to-earth distillation of an important topic.

  441. Ha ha ha ha thanks: interesting subject! I also want a pair of Ruby slippers when attending conferences abroad 🙂

  442. Ha ha ha ha thanks: interesting subject! I also want a pair of Ruby slippers when attending conferences abroad 🙂

  443. Ha ha ha ha thanks: interesting subject! I also want a pair of Ruby slippers when attending conferences abroad 🙂

  444. Ha ha ha ha thanks: interesting subject! I also want a pair of Ruby slippers when attending conferences abroad 🙂

  445. Ha ha ha ha thanks: interesting subject! I also want a pair of Ruby slippers when attending conferences abroad 🙂

  446. Peter Klein says:

    I have faught for over 30 years about documentation in databases. Far too often I have found documentation such as “a table” or “porcelain company products”. Databases are the heart of any institution. Far to often Boards and Archivists fail to realize the importance of documentation and lose the history of their community or institution.

  447. Peter Klein says:

    I have faught for over 30 years about documentation in databases. Far too often I have found documentation such as “a table” or “porcelain company products”. Databases are the heart of any institution. Far to often Boards and Archivists fail to realize the importance of documentation and lose the history of their community or institution.

  448. Peter Klein says:

    I have faught for over 30 years about documentation in databases. Far too often I have found documentation such as “a table” or “porcelain company products”. Databases are the heart of any institution. Far to often Boards and Archivists fail to realize the importance of documentation and lose the history of their community or institution.

  449. Peter Klein says:

    I have faught for over 30 years about documentation in databases. Far too often I have found documentation such as “a table” or “porcelain company products”. Databases are the heart of any institution. Far to often Boards and Archivists fail to realize the importance of documentation and lose the history of their community or institution.

  450. Peter Klein says:

    I have faught for over 30 years about documentation in databases. Far too often I have found documentation such as “a table” or “porcelain company products”. Databases are the heart of any institution. Far to often Boards and Archivists fail to realize the importance of documentation and lose the history of their community or institution.

  451. Fernando Almarza Rísquez says:

    Highly recommended. But, I am sure that all of you have considered this: it can be used terminologies besides the documents by themselves: Tags as “significative evidences” of those connections between two or more objects (I mean terminology gathered in thesauri).

    I usually use Tags (naming them “Referencias” in Spanish) assigned to each object, as part of its technical data. So, any used software can make “match” with the objects marked with the same Tag, showing on screen, and in a printed list, those results.

    These Tags will gather those terminologies as “clues” matching the objects, its documentation and its significances as “evidences”.

    I completed too a kind of “Directory of Tags” for each collection of some museums. By this way, the people and investigators can consult it and find the specific object (with its documentation) depending on the own interest.

    This is a mission for Curators, Registrars, Collections Managers, Documentalists and Educators in the museum, applying resources as those you are referring. Thank you.

  452. Fernando Almarza Rísquez says:

    Highly recommended. But, I am sure that all of you have considered this: it can be used terminologies besides the documents by themselves: Tags as “significative evidences” of those connections between two or more objects (I mean terminology gathered in thesauri).

    I usually use Tags (naming them “Referencias” in Spanish) assigned to each object, as part of its technical data. So, any used software can make “match” with the objects marked with the same Tag, showing on screen, and in a printed list, those results.

    These Tags will gather those terminologies as “clues” matching the objects, its documentation and its significances as “evidences”.

    I completed too a kind of “Directory of Tags” for each collection of some museums. By this way, the people and investigators can consult it and find the specific object (with its documentation) depending on the own interest.

    This is a mission for Curators, Registrars, Collections Managers, Documentalists and Educators in the museum, applying resources as those you are referring. Thank you.

  453. Fernando Almarza Rísquez says:

    Highly recommended. But, I am sure that all of you have considered this: it can be used terminologies besides the documents by themselves: Tags as “significative evidences” of those connections between two or more objects (I mean terminology gathered in thesauri).

    I usually use Tags (naming them “Referencias” in Spanish) assigned to each object, as part of its technical data. So, any used software can make “match” with the objects marked with the same Tag, showing on screen, and in a printed list, those results.

    These Tags will gather those terminologies as “clues” matching the objects, its documentation and its significances as “evidences”.

    I completed too a kind of “Directory of Tags” for each collection of some museums. By this way, the people and investigators can consult it and find the specific object (with its documentation) depending on the own interest.

    This is a mission for Curators, Registrars, Collections Managers, Documentalists and Educators in the museum, applying resources as those you are referring. Thank you.

  454. Fernando Almarza Rísquez says:

    Highly recommended. But, I am sure that all of you have considered this: it can be used terminologies besides the documents by themselves: Tags as “significative evidences” of those connections between two or more objects (I mean terminology gathered in thesauri).

    I usually use Tags (naming them “Referencias” in Spanish) assigned to each object, as part of its technical data. So, any used software can make “match” with the objects marked with the same Tag, showing on screen, and in a printed list, those results.

    These Tags will gather those terminologies as “clues” matching the objects, its documentation and its significances as “evidences”.

    I completed too a kind of “Directory of Tags” for each collection of some museums. By this way, the people and investigators can consult it and find the specific object (with its documentation) depending on the own interest.

    This is a mission for Curators, Registrars, Collections Managers, Documentalists and Educators in the museum, applying resources as those you are referring. Thank you.

  455. Fernando Almarza Rísquez says:

    Highly recommended. But, I am sure that all of you have considered this: it can be used terminologies besides the documents by themselves: Tags as “significative evidences” of those connections between two or more objects (I mean terminology gathered in thesauri).

    I usually use Tags (naming them “Referencias” in Spanish) assigned to each object, as part of its technical data. So, any used software can make “match” with the objects marked with the same Tag, showing on screen, and in a printed list, those results.

    These Tags will gather those terminologies as “clues” matching the objects, its documentation and its significances as “evidences”.

    I completed too a kind of “Directory of Tags” for each collection of some museums. By this way, the people and investigators can consult it and find the specific object (with its documentation) depending on the own interest.

    This is a mission for Curators, Registrars, Collections Managers, Documentalists and Educators in the museum, applying resources as those you are referring. Thank you.

  456. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I also took it for granted that connections between artefacts and archival material would be documented on the database. Sure it takes longer but is essential.

  457. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I also took it for granted that connections between artefacts and archival material would be documented on the database. Sure it takes longer but is essential.

  458. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I also took it for granted that connections between artefacts and archival material would be documented on the database. Sure it takes longer but is essential.

  459. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I also took it for granted that connections between artefacts and archival material would be documented on the database. Sure it takes longer but is essential.

  460. Evelyn Fidler says:

    I also took it for granted that connections between artefacts and archival material would be documented on the database. Sure it takes longer but is essential.

  461. Sharon McCullar says:

    Alert Programming! Vigilant curators, registrars, collections managers, and other behind the scenes staff have noted an uptick in the number of persons keenly interested in photographing artifacts and historic site structures in their quest for these creatures. Encourage “capture” as long as it is in public areas and not in violation of museum policy and try to engage these Pokemon-hordes in sharing the unique history, art and science they experience while they are in your museum! Online gamers have lots of friends and they like to invite them to play along, repeat visitors Yay!

  462. Sharon McCullar says:

    Alert Programming! Vigilant curators, registrars, collections managers, and other behind the scenes staff have noted an uptick in the number of persons keenly interested in photographing artifacts and historic site structures in their quest for these creatures. Encourage “capture” as long as it is in public areas and not in violation of museum policy and try to engage these Pokemon-hordes in sharing the unique history, art and science they experience while they are in your museum! Online gamers have lots of friends and they like to invite them to play along, repeat visitors Yay!

  463. Sharon McCullar says:

    Alert Programming! Vigilant curators, registrars, collections managers, and other behind the scenes staff have noted an uptick in the number of persons keenly interested in photographing artifacts and historic site structures in their quest for these creatures. Encourage “capture” as long as it is in public areas and not in violation of museum policy and try to engage these Pokemon-hordes in sharing the unique history, art and science they experience while they are in your museum! Online gamers have lots of friends and they like to invite them to play along, repeat visitors Yay!

  464. Sharon McCullar says:

    Alert Programming! Vigilant curators, registrars, collections managers, and other behind the scenes staff have noted an uptick in the number of persons keenly interested in photographing artifacts and historic site structures in their quest for these creatures. Encourage “capture” as long as it is in public areas and not in violation of museum policy and try to engage these Pokemon-hordes in sharing the unique history, art and science they experience while they are in your museum! Online gamers have lots of friends and they like to invite them to play along, repeat visitors Yay!

  465. Sharon McCullar says:

    Alert Programming! Vigilant curators, registrars, collections managers, and other behind the scenes staff have noted an uptick in the number of persons keenly interested in photographing artifacts and historic site structures in their quest for these creatures. Encourage “capture” as long as it is in public areas and not in violation of museum policy and try to engage these Pokemon-hordes in sharing the unique history, art and science they experience while they are in your museum! Online gamers have lots of friends and they like to invite them to play along, repeat visitors Yay!

  466. Iona McCraith, AAO Advisor says:

    Serious new pest threatens heritage collections world-wide. Have your pest management program updated.

    • Peter Klein says:

      These pests are capable of surviving all environmental controls. Beware! They are often found in packs and love storage facilities. They can be found on all shelving levels. Many infest the exterior of Historic Monuments such as the Columbus Street Watertower. Hordes of followers aare attracted to cemeteries. SURVIVAL IS NOT ASSURED!

    • Peter Klein says:

      These pests are capable of surviving all environmental controls. Beware! They are often found in packs and love storage facilities. They can be found on all shelving levels. Many infest the exterior of Historic Monuments such as the Columbus Street Watertower. Hordes of followers aare attracted to cemeteries. SURVIVAL IS NOT ASSURED!

    • Peter Klein says:

      These pests are capable of surviving all environmental controls. Beware! They are often found in packs and love storage facilities. They can be found on all shelving levels. Many infest the exterior of Historic Monuments such as the Columbus Street Watertower. Hordes of followers aare attracted to cemeteries. SURVIVAL IS NOT ASSURED!

    • Peter Klein says:

      These pests are capable of surviving all environmental controls. Beware! They are often found in packs and love storage facilities. They can be found on all shelving levels. Many infest the exterior of Historic Monuments such as the Columbus Street Watertower. Hordes of followers aare attracted to cemeteries. SURVIVAL IS NOT ASSURED!

    • Peter Klein says:

      These pests are capable of surviving all environmental controls. Beware! They are often found in packs and love storage facilities. They can be found on all shelving levels. Many infest the exterior of Historic Monuments such as the Columbus Street Watertower. Hordes of followers aare attracted to cemeteries. SURVIVAL IS NOT ASSURED!

  467. Iona McCraith, AAO Advisor says:

    Serious new pest threatens heritage collections world-wide. Have your pest management program updated.

  468. Iona McCraith, AAO Advisor says:

    Serious new pest threatens heritage collections world-wide. Have your pest management program updated.

  469. Iona McCraith, AAO Advisor says:

    Serious new pest threatens heritage collections world-wide. Have your pest management program updated.

  470. Iona McCraith, AAO Advisor says:

    Serious new pest threatens heritage collections world-wide. Have your pest management program updated.

  471. Judith Vance says:

    Congratulations, Angela! It’s a great book, you did a wonderful job!
    I’m sure it isn’t going to be your only book— Best wishes from Judith Vance (Darlene’s friend)

  472. Judith Vance says:

    Congratulations, Angela! It’s a great book, you did a wonderful job!
    I’m sure it isn’t going to be your only book— Best wishes from Judith Vance (Darlene’s friend)

  473. Judith Vance says:

    Congratulations, Angela! It’s a great book, you did a wonderful job!
    I’m sure it isn’t going to be your only book— Best wishes from Judith Vance (Darlene’s friend)

  474. Judith Vance says:

    Congratulations, Angela! It’s a great book, you did a wonderful job!
    I’m sure it isn’t going to be your only book— Best wishes from Judith Vance (Darlene’s friend)

  475. Judith Vance says:

    Congratulations, Angela! It’s a great book, you did a wonderful job!
    I’m sure it isn’t going to be your only book— Best wishes from Judith Vance (Darlene’s friend)

  476. Peter Klein says:

    I ferl your excitement through your language. Good Luck snd remember yo have fun!

  477. Peter Klein says:

    I ferl your excitement through your language. Good Luck snd remember yo have fun!

  478. Peter Klein says:

    I ferl your excitement through your language. Good Luck snd remember yo have fun!

  479. Peter Klein says:

    I ferl your excitement through your language. Good Luck snd remember yo have fun!

  480. Peter Klein says:

    I ferl your excitement through your language. Good Luck snd remember yo have fun!

  481. Peter Klein says:

    I have attemped to make exhibits, walks, programs and recorded interviews accessible for peoplewith all disabilities. My volunteer workers have always included students and adults with disabilities. I included students who had visual disabilities. After my resignation as City of Sun Prsirie Museum Curator these programs stopped.
    I am now a Board Member and Advisor for the Island Church Foundation in Waterloo Townshipsith the provision that alll students and adults are welcome as volunteers.

  482. Peter Klein says:

    I have attemped to make exhibits, walks, programs and recorded interviews accessible for peoplewith all disabilities. My volunteer workers have always included students and adults with disabilities. I included students who had visual disabilities. After my resignation as City of Sun Prsirie Museum Curator these programs stopped.
    I am now a Board Member and Advisor for the Island Church Foundation in Waterloo Townshipsith the provision that alll students and adults are welcome as volunteers.

  483. Peter Klein says:

    I have attemped to make exhibits, walks, programs and recorded interviews accessible for peoplewith all disabilities. My volunteer workers have always included students and adults with disabilities. I included students who had visual disabilities. After my resignation as City of Sun Prsirie Museum Curator these programs stopped.
    I am now a Board Member and Advisor for the Island Church Foundation in Waterloo Townshipsith the provision that alll students and adults are welcome as volunteers.

  484. Peter Klein says:

    I have attemped to make exhibits, walks, programs and recorded interviews accessible for peoplewith all disabilities. My volunteer workers have always included students and adults with disabilities. I included students who had visual disabilities. After my resignation as City of Sun Prsirie Museum Curator these programs stopped.
    I am now a Board Member and Advisor for the Island Church Foundation in Waterloo Townshipsith the provision that alll students and adults are welcome as volunteers.

  485. Peter Klein says:

    I have attemped to make exhibits, walks, programs and recorded interviews accessible for peoplewith all disabilities. My volunteer workers have always included students and adults with disabilities. I included students who had visual disabilities. After my resignation as City of Sun Prsirie Museum Curator these programs stopped.
    I am now a Board Member and Advisor for the Island Church Foundation in Waterloo Townshipsith the provision that alll students and adults are welcome as volunteers.

  486. warren says:

    Thanks for the names of the screen reader apps. QR codes just have not worked for us.

  487. warren says:

    Thanks for the names of the screen reader apps. QR codes just have not worked for us.

  488. warren says:

    Thanks for the names of the screen reader apps. QR codes just have not worked for us.

  489. warren says:

    Thanks for the names of the screen reader apps. QR codes just have not worked for us.

  490. warren says:

    Thanks for the names of the screen reader apps. QR codes just have not worked for us.

  491. […] De récents ateliers professionnels de développement, webinars et articles ont démontrés comment un certain nombre de musées ont créés des programmes qui donnes de nouvelles manières imaginatives à donner aux visiteurs déficients pour expérimenter les musées.  […]

  492. […] De récents ateliers professionnels de développement, webinars et articles ont démontrés comment un certain nombre de musées ont créés des programmes qui donnes de nouvelles manières imaginatives à donner aux visiteurs déficients pour expérimenter les musées.  […]

  493. […] De récents ateliers professionnels de développement, webinars et articles ont démontrés comment un certain nombre de musées ont créés des programmes qui donnes de nouvelles manières imaginatives à donner aux visiteurs déficients pour expérimenter les musées.  […]

  494. […] De récents ateliers professionnels de développement, webinars et articles ont démontrés comment un certain nombre de musées ont créés des programmes qui donnes de nouvelles manières imaginatives à donner aux visiteurs déficients pour expérimenter les musées.  […]

  495. […] De récents ateliers professionnels de développement, webinars et articles ont démontrés comment un certain nombre de musées ont créés des programmes qui donnes de nouvelles manières imaginatives à donner aux visiteurs déficients pour expérimenter les musées.  […]

  496. Peter Klein says:

    The use of wood shelvihg surprised me. I am working on replacing wood with metal sheving. Am I wasting time and money?

  497. Peter Klein says:

    The use of wood shelvihg surprised me. I am working on replacing wood with metal sheving. Am I wasting time and money?

  498. Peter Klein says:

    The use of wood shelvihg surprised me. I am working on replacing wood with metal sheving. Am I wasting time and money?

  499. Peter Klein says:

    The use of wood shelvihg surprised me. I am working on replacing wood with metal sheving. Am I wasting time and money?

  500. Peter Klein says:

    The use of wood shelvihg surprised me. I am working on replacing wood with metal sheving. Am I wasting time and money?

  501. Barry Knight says:

    The crucial point with any datalogger, commercial or home-made, is the quality of the sensors – particularly the RH sensor. Cheap sensors may be unreliable, especially at high or low RH, and they may lose their calibration quite rapidly. We all know there is a temptation to skimp on calibration, or to rely on the data uncritically, so my advice is to buy the best sensors or loggers you can afford and to calibrate them regularly.

    • Angela says:

      Hi Barry,
      you are right, the sensors are key, so is checking and calibrating them regularily. This post is just the Quick Start Guide, the next posts will take a deeper look at the used components and discuss the options. So, next up will be:
      1. Arduino and shields
      2. Sensors
      3. Coding
      Maybe some additional considerations, let’s see.
      Of course interchanging with other posts, so the readers not interested won’t get bored 😉

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi Barry,
      you are right, the sensors are key, so is checking and calibrating them regularily. This post is just the Quick Start Guide, the next posts will take a deeper look at the used components and discuss the options. So, next up will be:
      1. Arduino and shields
      2. Sensors
      3. Coding
      Maybe some additional considerations, let’s see.
      Of course interchanging with other posts, so the readers not interested won’t get bored 😉

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi Barry,
      you are right, the sensors are key, so is checking and calibrating them regularily. This post is just the Quick Start Guide, the next posts will take a deeper look at the used components and discuss the options. So, next up will be:
      1. Arduino and shields
      2. Sensors
      3. Coding
      Maybe some additional considerations, let’s see.
      Of course interchanging with other posts, so the readers not interested won’t get bored 😉

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi Barry,
      you are right, the sensors are key, so is checking and calibrating them regularily. This post is just the Quick Start Guide, the next posts will take a deeper look at the used components and discuss the options. So, next up will be:
      1. Arduino and shields
      2. Sensors
      3. Coding
      Maybe some additional considerations, let’s see.
      Of course interchanging with other posts, so the readers not interested won’t get bored 😉

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi Barry,
      you are right, the sensors are key, so is checking and calibrating them regularily. This post is just the Quick Start Guide, the next posts will take a deeper look at the used components and discuss the options. So, next up will be:
      1. Arduino and shields
      2. Sensors
      3. Coding
      Maybe some additional considerations, let’s see.
      Of course interchanging with other posts, so the readers not interested won’t get bored 😉

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • William Lull says:

      Checking RH calibration beyond the effective use of an aspirating psychrometer is rarely done. However, with several loggers, typically $120USD each, you can gather them once or twice a year and compare readings. Replace any loggers that are out of acceptable range (though you can continue to use them for temperature logging). This is the most prudent and cost-effective data logger approach.

      • Angela says:

        Actually, just to compare readings can lead to mistakes, as their sensors might have the same drift, especially when purchased around the same time. Your loggers might all show 10% off but you don’t realize because they all show aroud 35% instead of 45%, which seems reasonable. What proves quite effective is comparing their readings in a container with NaCl athmosphere (75%) and MgCl athmosphere (33%). You get an idea if they drift, in which direction they drift, if the drift is linear and if their reaction time is still okay.

      • Angela says:

        Actually, just to compare readings can lead to mistakes, as their sensors might have the same drift, especially when purchased around the same time. Your loggers might all show 10% off but you don’t realize because they all show aroud 35% instead of 45%, which seems reasonable. What proves quite effective is comparing their readings in a container with NaCl athmosphere (75%) and MgCl athmosphere (33%). You get an idea if they drift, in which direction they drift, if the drift is linear and if their reaction time is still okay.

      • Angela says:

        Actually, just to compare readings can lead to mistakes, as their sensors might have the same drift, especially when purchased around the same time. Your loggers might all show 10% off but you don’t realize because they all show aroud 35% instead of 45%, which seems reasonable. What proves quite effective is comparing their readings in a container with NaCl athmosphere (75%) and MgCl athmosphere (33%). You get an idea if they drift, in which direction they drift, if the drift is linear and if their reaction time is still okay.

      • Angela says:

        Actually, just to compare readings can lead to mistakes, as their sensors might have the same drift, especially when purchased around the same time. Your loggers might all show 10% off but you don’t realize because they all show aroud 35% instead of 45%, which seems reasonable. What proves quite effective is comparing their readings in a container with NaCl athmosphere (75%) and MgCl athmosphere (33%). You get an idea if they drift, in which direction they drift, if the drift is linear and if their reaction time is still okay.

      • Angela says:

        Actually, just to compare readings can lead to mistakes, as their sensors might have the same drift, especially when purchased around the same time. Your loggers might all show 10% off but you don’t realize because they all show aroud 35% instead of 45%, which seems reasonable. What proves quite effective is comparing their readings in a container with NaCl athmosphere (75%) and MgCl athmosphere (33%). You get an idea if they drift, in which direction they drift, if the drift is linear and if their reaction time is still okay.

    • William Lull says:

      Checking RH calibration beyond the effective use of an aspirating psychrometer is rarely done. However, with several loggers, typically $120USD each, you can gather them once or twice a year and compare readings. Replace any loggers that are out of acceptable range (though you can continue to use them for temperature logging). This is the most prudent and cost-effective data logger approach.

    • William Lull says:

      Checking RH calibration beyond the effective use of an aspirating psychrometer is rarely done. However, with several loggers, typically $120USD each, you can gather them once or twice a year and compare readings. Replace any loggers that are out of acceptable range (though you can continue to use them for temperature logging). This is the most prudent and cost-effective data logger approach.

    • William Lull says:

      Checking RH calibration beyond the effective use of an aspirating psychrometer is rarely done. However, with several loggers, typically $120USD each, you can gather them once or twice a year and compare readings. Replace any loggers that are out of acceptable range (though you can continue to use them for temperature logging). This is the most prudent and cost-effective data logger approach.

    • William Lull says:

      Checking RH calibration beyond the effective use of an aspirating psychrometer is rarely done. However, with several loggers, typically $120USD each, you can gather them once or twice a year and compare readings. Replace any loggers that are out of acceptable range (though you can continue to use them for temperature logging). This is the most prudent and cost-effective data logger approach.

  502. Barry Knight says:

    The crucial point with any datalogger, commercial or home-made, is the quality of the sensors – particularly the RH sensor. Cheap sensors may be unreliable, especially at high or low RH, and they may lose their calibration quite rapidly. We all know there is a temptation to skimp on calibration, or to rely on the data uncritically, so my advice is to buy the best sensors or loggers you can afford and to calibrate them regularly.

  503. Barry Knight says:

    The crucial point with any datalogger, commercial or home-made, is the quality of the sensors – particularly the RH sensor. Cheap sensors may be unreliable, especially at high or low RH, and they may lose their calibration quite rapidly. We all know there is a temptation to skimp on calibration, or to rely on the data uncritically, so my advice is to buy the best sensors or loggers you can afford and to calibrate them regularly.

  504. Barry Knight says:

    The crucial point with any datalogger, commercial or home-made, is the quality of the sensors – particularly the RH sensor. Cheap sensors may be unreliable, especially at high or low RH, and they may lose their calibration quite rapidly. We all know there is a temptation to skimp on calibration, or to rely on the data uncritically, so my advice is to buy the best sensors or loggers you can afford and to calibrate them regularly.

  505. Barry Knight says:

    The crucial point with any datalogger, commercial or home-made, is the quality of the sensors – particularly the RH sensor. Cheap sensors may be unreliable, especially at high or low RH, and they may lose their calibration quite rapidly. We all know there is a temptation to skimp on calibration, or to rely on the data uncritically, so my advice is to buy the best sensors or loggers you can afford and to calibrate them regularly.

  506. […] Source: Build Your Own Data Logger – Quick Start Guide | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation […]

  507. […] Source: Build Your Own Data Logger – Quick Start Guide | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation […]

  508. […] Source: Build Your Own Data Logger – Quick Start Guide | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation […]

  509. […] Source: Build Your Own Data Logger – Quick Start Guide | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation […]

  510. […] Source: Build Your Own Data Logger – Quick Start Guide | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation […]

  511. William Lull says:

    Since you point out that commercial loggers are available to do this same task, can you cite reasons or link us to a discussion to the problems a DIY logger solves? Maybe a case study would help, including a cost comparison of commercial vs DIY.

    • Angela says:

      Hi William,

      thanks for the input. Unfortunately, I haven’t taken a note everytime I saw someone asking for recommendations for affordable dataloggers on the MUSEUM-L or RC-AAM listserv but I’ve seen quite a few and some of them asking if some cheap gadgets for about 50 € can do the job just as well. Well, for the same price you can build your own, of course if you don’t count the costs of your own working hours. I see the following advantages:

      – For the same price a comparably cheap off-the-shelf solution costs you get a logger you know what it is capable of because you know the components you used.
      – If the sensor loses reliability (of course you have to check and calibrate it on a regular basis, like every logger), it is easy to replace at a reasonable price (the comparably expensive one I used here is at around 8 Euros (9 USD)). I will discuss this in the part about chosing the sensor which is coming up, this is just the quick start guide.
      – As grants for preventive conservation are few but there is a high interest in supporting STEM education, it’s a win-win if you do this as a project together with your local highschool. The kids learning about coding and microcontrollers and at the same time about the importance of preventive conservation and how climate data is used at their local history museum.
      – If you build it yourself, you learn a lot about coding and microcontrollers, which opens up new possibilities both for your institution as well as you personally.

      Again, if you do have the money to buy a commercial logger and the money to have it calibrated regularily, go for it. There are pretty good ones on the market, of course not mentioning names here. But I know that especially small museums struggle with getting money for such devices and for them it might be easier to find technically interested volunteers to help them with building such a thing.

      Of curse, if anyone is aware of a case study, I would be interested in sharing it here.

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi William,

      thanks for the input. Unfortunately, I haven’t taken a note everytime I saw someone asking for recommendations for affordable dataloggers on the MUSEUM-L or RC-AAM listserv but I’ve seen quite a few and some of them asking if some cheap gadgets for about 50 € can do the job just as well. Well, for the same price you can build your own, of course if you don’t count the costs of your own working hours. I see the following advantages:

      – For the same price a comparably cheap off-the-shelf solution costs you get a logger you know what it is capable of because you know the components you used.
      – If the sensor loses reliability (of course you have to check and calibrate it on a regular basis, like every logger), it is easy to replace at a reasonable price (the comparably expensive one I used here is at around 8 Euros (9 USD)). I will discuss this in the part about chosing the sensor which is coming up, this is just the quick start guide.
      – As grants for preventive conservation are few but there is a high interest in supporting STEM education, it’s a win-win if you do this as a project together with your local highschool. The kids learning about coding and microcontrollers and at the same time about the importance of preventive conservation and how climate data is used at their local history museum.
      – If you build it yourself, you learn a lot about coding and microcontrollers, which opens up new possibilities both for your institution as well as you personally.

      Again, if you do have the money to buy a commercial logger and the money to have it calibrated regularily, go for it. There are pretty good ones on the market, of course not mentioning names here. But I know that especially small museums struggle with getting money for such devices and for them it might be easier to find technically interested volunteers to help them with building such a thing.

      Of curse, if anyone is aware of a case study, I would be interested in sharing it here.

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi William,

      thanks for the input. Unfortunately, I haven’t taken a note everytime I saw someone asking for recommendations for affordable dataloggers on the MUSEUM-L or RC-AAM listserv but I’ve seen quite a few and some of them asking if some cheap gadgets for about 50 € can do the job just as well. Well, for the same price you can build your own, of course if you don’t count the costs of your own working hours. I see the following advantages:

      – For the same price a comparably cheap off-the-shelf solution costs you get a logger you know what it is capable of because you know the components you used.
      – If the sensor loses reliability (of course you have to check and calibrate it on a regular basis, like every logger), it is easy to replace at a reasonable price (the comparably expensive one I used here is at around 8 Euros (9 USD)). I will discuss this in the part about chosing the sensor which is coming up, this is just the quick start guide.
      – As grants for preventive conservation are few but there is a high interest in supporting STEM education, it’s a win-win if you do this as a project together with your local highschool. The kids learning about coding and microcontrollers and at the same time about the importance of preventive conservation and how climate data is used at their local history museum.
      – If you build it yourself, you learn a lot about coding and microcontrollers, which opens up new possibilities both for your institution as well as you personally.

      Again, if you do have the money to buy a commercial logger and the money to have it calibrated regularily, go for it. There are pretty good ones on the market, of course not mentioning names here. But I know that especially small museums struggle with getting money for such devices and for them it might be easier to find technically interested volunteers to help them with building such a thing.

      Of curse, if anyone is aware of a case study, I would be interested in sharing it here.

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi William,

      thanks for the input. Unfortunately, I haven’t taken a note everytime I saw someone asking for recommendations for affordable dataloggers on the MUSEUM-L or RC-AAM listserv but I’ve seen quite a few and some of them asking if some cheap gadgets for about 50 € can do the job just as well. Well, for the same price you can build your own, of course if you don’t count the costs of your own working hours. I see the following advantages:

      – For the same price a comparably cheap off-the-shelf solution costs you get a logger you know what it is capable of because you know the components you used.
      – If the sensor loses reliability (of course you have to check and calibrate it on a regular basis, like every logger), it is easy to replace at a reasonable price (the comparably expensive one I used here is at around 8 Euros (9 USD)). I will discuss this in the part about chosing the sensor which is coming up, this is just the quick start guide.
      – As grants for preventive conservation are few but there is a high interest in supporting STEM education, it’s a win-win if you do this as a project together with your local highschool. The kids learning about coding and microcontrollers and at the same time about the importance of preventive conservation and how climate data is used at their local history museum.
      – If you build it yourself, you learn a lot about coding and microcontrollers, which opens up new possibilities both for your institution as well as you personally.

      Again, if you do have the money to buy a commercial logger and the money to have it calibrated regularily, go for it. There are pretty good ones on the market, of course not mentioning names here. But I know that especially small museums struggle with getting money for such devices and for them it might be easier to find technically interested volunteers to help them with building such a thing.

      Of curse, if anyone is aware of a case study, I would be interested in sharing it here.

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi William,

      thanks for the input. Unfortunately, I haven’t taken a note everytime I saw someone asking for recommendations for affordable dataloggers on the MUSEUM-L or RC-AAM listserv but I’ve seen quite a few and some of them asking if some cheap gadgets for about 50 € can do the job just as well. Well, for the same price you can build your own, of course if you don’t count the costs of your own working hours. I see the following advantages:

      – For the same price a comparably cheap off-the-shelf solution costs you get a logger you know what it is capable of because you know the components you used.
      – If the sensor loses reliability (of course you have to check and calibrate it on a regular basis, like every logger), it is easy to replace at a reasonable price (the comparably expensive one I used here is at around 8 Euros (9 USD)). I will discuss this in the part about chosing the sensor which is coming up, this is just the quick start guide.
      – As grants for preventive conservation are few but there is a high interest in supporting STEM education, it’s a win-win if you do this as a project together with your local highschool. The kids learning about coding and microcontrollers and at the same time about the importance of preventive conservation and how climate data is used at their local history museum.
      – If you build it yourself, you learn a lot about coding and microcontrollers, which opens up new possibilities both for your institution as well as you personally.

      Again, if you do have the money to buy a commercial logger and the money to have it calibrated regularily, go for it. There are pretty good ones on the market, of course not mentioning names here. But I know that especially small museums struggle with getting money for such devices and for them it might be easier to find technically interested volunteers to help them with building such a thing.

      Of curse, if anyone is aware of a case study, I would be interested in sharing it here.

      Best wishes
      Angela

  512. William Lull says:

    Since you point out that commercial loggers are available to do this same task, can you cite reasons or link us to a discussion to the problems a DIY logger solves? Maybe a case study would help, including a cost comparison of commercial vs DIY.

  513. William Lull says:

    Since you point out that commercial loggers are available to do this same task, can you cite reasons or link us to a discussion to the problems a DIY logger solves? Maybe a case study would help, including a cost comparison of commercial vs DIY.

  514. William Lull says:

    Since you point out that commercial loggers are available to do this same task, can you cite reasons or link us to a discussion to the problems a DIY logger solves? Maybe a case study would help, including a cost comparison of commercial vs DIY.

  515. William Lull says:

    Since you point out that commercial loggers are available to do this same task, can you cite reasons or link us to a discussion to the problems a DIY logger solves? Maybe a case study would help, including a cost comparison of commercial vs DIY.

  516. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  517. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  518. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  519. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  520. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  521. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  522. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  523. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  524. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  525. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  526. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  527. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  528. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  529. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  530. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  531. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  532. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  533. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  534. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  535. […] Spreading the word: explaining what Museum Documentation is – and why it’s important […]

  536. Edmund says:

    It’s closer than you think Anne.. have a look at https://www.unipi.it/index.php/english-news/item/7156 for a project that has the ambition to automatically identify archaeological pottery

  537. Edmund says:

    It’s closer than you think Anne.. have a look at https://www.unipi.it/index.php/english-news/item/7156 for a project that has the ambition to automatically identify archaeological pottery

  538. Edmund says:

    It’s closer than you think Anne.. have a look at https://www.unipi.it/index.php/english-news/item/7156 for a project that has the ambition to automatically identify archaeological pottery

  539. Edmund says:

    It’s closer than you think Anne.. have a look at https://www.unipi.it/index.php/english-news/item/7156 for a project that has the ambition to automatically identify archaeological pottery

  540. Edmund says:

    It’s closer than you think Anne.. have a look at https://www.unipi.it/index.php/english-news/item/7156 for a project that has the ambition to automatically identify archaeological pottery

  541. Kara Vetter says:

    I mean they already have reverse image search and like image search on Google, so there’s got to be a way.

  542. Kara Vetter says:

    I mean they already have reverse image search and like image search on Google, so there’s got to be a way.

  543. Kara Vetter says:

    I mean they already have reverse image search and like image search on Google, so there’s got to be a way.

  544. Kara Vetter says:

    I mean they already have reverse image search and like image search on Google, so there’s got to be a way.

  545. Kara Vetter says:

    I mean they already have reverse image search and like image search on Google, so there’s got to be a way.

  546. Angela Linn says:

    I LOVE this idea and am sure it is not that far in the future. If they can do it for flowers, why not man-made objects?

  547. Angela Linn says:

    I LOVE this idea and am sure it is not that far in the future. If they can do it for flowers, why not man-made objects?

  548. Angela Linn says:

    I LOVE this idea and am sure it is not that far in the future. If they can do it for flowers, why not man-made objects?

  549. Angela Linn says:

    I LOVE this idea and am sure it is not that far in the future. If they can do it for flowers, why not man-made objects?

  550. Angela Linn says:

    I LOVE this idea and am sure it is not that far in the future. If they can do it for flowers, why not man-made objects?

  551. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    EXCELLENT IDEA!

  552. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    EXCELLENT IDEA!

  553. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    EXCELLENT IDEA!

  554. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    EXCELLENT IDEA!

  555. Diane Waterhouse Barbarisi says:

    EXCELLENT IDEA!

  556. evelyn says:

    I digital version would be wonderful for searching through! I also agree, for what we paid for the book it is poorly bound.

  557. evelyn says:

    I digital version would be wonderful for searching through! I also agree, for what we paid for the book it is poorly bound.

  558. evelyn says:

    I digital version would be wonderful for searching through! I also agree, for what we paid for the book it is poorly bound.

  559. evelyn says:

    I digital version would be wonderful for searching through! I also agree, for what we paid for the book it is poorly bound.

  560. evelyn says:

    I digital version would be wonderful for searching through! I also agree, for what we paid for the book it is poorly bound.

  561. Thank you for all your efforts bringing this to those of us in need, Angela! I have a feeling a great many of us need help rescuing our collections from poor collections management of the past. Thanks for the lifeline!

  562. Thank you for all your efforts bringing this to those of us in need, Angela! I have a feeling a great many of us need help rescuing our collections from poor collections management of the past. Thanks for the lifeline!

  563. Thank you for all your efforts bringing this to those of us in need, Angela! I have a feeling a great many of us need help rescuing our collections from poor collections management of the past. Thanks for the lifeline!

  564. Thank you for all your efforts bringing this to those of us in need, Angela! I have a feeling a great many of us need help rescuing our collections from poor collections management of the past. Thanks for the lifeline!

  565. Thank you for all your efforts bringing this to those of us in need, Angela! I have a feeling a great many of us need help rescuing our collections from poor collections management of the past. Thanks for the lifeline!

  566. Congratulations Angela! Looking forward to the course next year.

  567. Congratulations Angela! Looking forward to the course next year.

  568. Congratulations Angela! Looking forward to the course next year.

  569. Congratulations Angela! Looking forward to the course next year.

  570. Congratulations Angela! Looking forward to the course next year.

  571. Evelyn says:

    congratulations! I wish the discount applied to none American orders but is worth the full price.

    • Angela says:

      Oh, so sorry, hadn’t realized that detail!
      Hope you are satisfied with the book, anyway.
      Best,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Oh, so sorry, hadn’t realized that detail!
      Hope you are satisfied with the book, anyway.
      Best,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Oh, so sorry, hadn’t realized that detail!
      Hope you are satisfied with the book, anyway.
      Best,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Oh, so sorry, hadn’t realized that detail!
      Hope you are satisfied with the book, anyway.
      Best,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Oh, so sorry, hadn’t realized that detail!
      Hope you are satisfied with the book, anyway.
      Best,
      Angela

  572. Evelyn says:

    congratulations! I wish the discount applied to none American orders but is worth the full price.

  573. Evelyn says:

    congratulations! I wish the discount applied to none American orders but is worth the full price.

  574. Evelyn says:

    congratulations! I wish the discount applied to none American orders but is worth the full price.

  575. Evelyn says:

    congratulations! I wish the discount applied to none American orders but is worth the full price.

  576. rebecca remington says:

    I really like this website and thank you so much for all the time you put into doing this for the rest of us out here.

  577. rebecca remington says:

    I really like this website and thank you so much for all the time you put into doing this for the rest of us out here.

  578. rebecca remington says:

    I really like this website and thank you so much for all the time you put into doing this for the rest of us out here.

  579. rebecca remington says:

    I really like this website and thank you so much for all the time you put into doing this for the rest of us out here.

  580. rebecca remington says:

    I really like this website and thank you so much for all the time you put into doing this for the rest of us out here.

  581. Aurore says:

    So, so proud of you ! I want it ! 😉

  582. Aurore says:

    So, so proud of you ! I want it ! 😉

  583. Aurore says:

    So, so proud of you ! I want it ! 😉

  584. Aurore says:

    So, so proud of you ! I want it ! 😉

  585. Aurore says:

    So, so proud of you ! I want it ! 😉

  586. Aurore says:

    If only I could go there…. ;(

  587. Aurore says:

    If only I could go there…. ;(

  588. Aurore says:

    If only I could go there…. ;(

  589. Aurore says:

    If only I could go there…. ;(

  590. Aurore says:

    If only I could go there…. ;(

  591. Dear Angela,

    I will write a report for my colleagues, and for our website (a blog).
    So I can always sent you my notes if you are interested.

    Kind regards,
    Julie Lambrechts
    FARO Vlaams steunpunt voor cultureel erfgoed

  592. Dear Angela,

    I will write a report for my colleagues, and for our website (a blog).
    So I can always sent you my notes if you are interested.

    Kind regards,
    Julie Lambrechts
    FARO Vlaams steunpunt voor cultureel erfgoed

  593. Dear Angela,

    I will write a report for my colleagues, and for our website (a blog).
    So I can always sent you my notes if you are interested.

    Kind regards,
    Julie Lambrechts
    FARO Vlaams steunpunt voor cultureel erfgoed

  594. Dear Angela,

    I will write a report for my colleagues, and for our website (a blog).
    So I can always sent you my notes if you are interested.

    Kind regards,
    Julie Lambrechts
    FARO Vlaams steunpunt voor cultureel erfgoed

  595. Dear Angela,

    I will write a report for my colleagues, and for our website (a blog).
    So I can always sent you my notes if you are interested.

    Kind regards,
    Julie Lambrechts
    FARO Vlaams steunpunt voor cultureel erfgoed

  596. […] delivered this paper, I’m going to turn my attention to the talk that I’m giving with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, in one of the CIDOC sessions at the ICOM 2016 conference in Milan in […]

  597. […] delivered this paper, I’m going to turn my attention to the talk that I’m giving with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, in one of the CIDOC sessions at the ICOM 2016 conference in Milan in […]

  598. […] delivered this paper, I’m going to turn my attention to the talk that I’m giving with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, in one of the CIDOC sessions at the ICOM 2016 conference in Milan in […]

  599. […] delivered this paper, I’m going to turn my attention to the talk that I’m giving with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, in one of the CIDOC sessions at the ICOM 2016 conference in Milan in […]

  600. […] delivered this paper, I’m going to turn my attention to the talk that I’m giving with Angela Kipp of the Technoseum in Mannheim, in one of the CIDOC sessions at the ICOM 2016 conference in Milan in […]

  601. Dear Angela,
    I am sorry to hear you will not be able to attend, I was hoping to meet you there! I am writing up a report for my colleagues in any case, and will try to write up a special report about a session that catches my particular interest for this website!
    best wishes,
    Catharina van Daalen
    Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

    • Angela says:

      Dear Catharina,

      thank you so much. I’m looking forward to your report. I’m really sad I can’t attend, too, because it would have been a great chance to meet many of our contributors and readers. But, as much as I love museums and my work, family comes first.

      Best wishes,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Dear Catharina,

      thank you so much. I’m looking forward to your report. I’m really sad I can’t attend, too, because it would have been a great chance to meet many of our contributors and readers. But, as much as I love museums and my work, family comes first.

      Best wishes,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Dear Catharina,

      thank you so much. I’m looking forward to your report. I’m really sad I can’t attend, too, because it would have been a great chance to meet many of our contributors and readers. But, as much as I love museums and my work, family comes first.

      Best wishes,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Dear Catharina,

      thank you so much. I’m looking forward to your report. I’m really sad I can’t attend, too, because it would have been a great chance to meet many of our contributors and readers. But, as much as I love museums and my work, family comes first.

      Best wishes,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Dear Catharina,

      thank you so much. I’m looking forward to your report. I’m really sad I can’t attend, too, because it would have been a great chance to meet many of our contributors and readers. But, as much as I love museums and my work, family comes first.

      Best wishes,
      Angela

  602. Dear Angela,
    I am sorry to hear you will not be able to attend, I was hoping to meet you there! I am writing up a report for my colleagues in any case, and will try to write up a special report about a session that catches my particular interest for this website!
    best wishes,
    Catharina van Daalen
    Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

  603. Dear Angela,
    I am sorry to hear you will not be able to attend, I was hoping to meet you there! I am writing up a report for my colleagues in any case, and will try to write up a special report about a session that catches my particular interest for this website!
    best wishes,
    Catharina van Daalen
    Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

  604. Dear Angela,
    I am sorry to hear you will not be able to attend, I was hoping to meet you there! I am writing up a report for my colleagues in any case, and will try to write up a special report about a session that catches my particular interest for this website!
    best wishes,
    Catharina van Daalen
    Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

  605. Dear Angela,
    I am sorry to hear you will not be able to attend, I was hoping to meet you there! I am writing up a report for my colleagues in any case, and will try to write up a special report about a session that catches my particular interest for this website!
    best wishes,
    Catharina van Daalen
    Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

  606. Any thought of posting instructions for the do-dads that you make? I have an Arduino user in-house (one of my kids) and if I was able to just hand him instructions and a bribe (most likely more parts or coffee!) he’d probably make them for me.

    I can also see this as a great source of projects for a teen group at a museum or maybe the local library.

    Oh the possibilities!

  607. Any thought of posting instructions for the do-dads that you make? I have an Arduino user in-house (one of my kids) and if I was able to just hand him instructions and a bribe (most likely more parts or coffee!) he’d probably make them for me.

    I can also see this as a great source of projects for a teen group at a museum or maybe the local library.

    Oh the possibilities!

  608. Any thought of posting instructions for the do-dads that you make? I have an Arduino user in-house (one of my kids) and if I was able to just hand him instructions and a bribe (most likely more parts or coffee!) he’d probably make them for me.

    I can also see this as a great source of projects for a teen group at a museum or maybe the local library.

    Oh the possibilities!

  609. Any thought of posting instructions for the do-dads that you make? I have an Arduino user in-house (one of my kids) and if I was able to just hand him instructions and a bribe (most likely more parts or coffee!) he’d probably make them for me.

    I can also see this as a great source of projects for a teen group at a museum or maybe the local library.

    Oh the possibilities!

  610. Any thought of posting instructions for the do-dads that you make? I have an Arduino user in-house (one of my kids) and if I was able to just hand him instructions and a bribe (most likely more parts or coffee!) he’d probably make them for me.

    I can also see this as a great source of projects for a teen group at a museum or maybe the local library.

    Oh the possibilities!

  611. KJ says:

    I work for a history museum that shares an atrium with a car museum. We had an old car that we had to move from one end of our museum to another, taking off doors in the process so that it would fit. Someone had to sit inside and steer, we had to lift and pivot at points…all in all, it took half a dozen of us over two hours to move the car. At the end of our task, one of the curators from the car museum came over and simply asked, “Why didn’t you just borrow our go-jacks?” *sigh*

    • Angela says:

      LOL – well, well, next time you’ll know to ask the neigbours, first. 🙂

    • Angela says:

      LOL – well, well, next time you’ll know to ask the neigbours, first. 🙂

    • Angela says:

      LOL – well, well, next time you’ll know to ask the neigbours, first. 🙂

    • Angela says:

      LOL – well, well, next time you’ll know to ask the neigbours, first. 🙂

    • Angela says:

      LOL – well, well, next time you’ll know to ask the neigbours, first. 🙂

    • Aurore T says:

      I have to say, that for the carriages we didn’t had the idea at first…
      We move the two biggest ones (5 tons & 2,5 tons) with 6 persons… At the end of the day, the leader of the handlers says :”OK, tomorrow for the other ones, we come with “Kojaks”…” – “Ko-WHAT ?????”….Now I know…..

    • Aurore T says:

      I have to say, that for the carriages we didn’t had the idea at first…
      We move the two biggest ones (5 tons & 2,5 tons) with 6 persons… At the end of the day, the leader of the handlers says :”OK, tomorrow for the other ones, we come with “Kojaks”…” – “Ko-WHAT ?????”….Now I know…..

    • Aurore T says:

      I have to say, that for the carriages we didn’t had the idea at first…
      We move the two biggest ones (5 tons & 2,5 tons) with 6 persons… At the end of the day, the leader of the handlers says :”OK, tomorrow for the other ones, we come with “Kojaks”…” – “Ko-WHAT ?????”….Now I know…..

    • Aurore T says:

      I have to say, that for the carriages we didn’t had the idea at first…
      We move the two biggest ones (5 tons & 2,5 tons) with 6 persons… At the end of the day, the leader of the handlers says :”OK, tomorrow for the other ones, we come with “Kojaks”…” – “Ko-WHAT ?????”….Now I know…..

    • Aurore T says:

      I have to say, that for the carriages we didn’t had the idea at first…
      We move the two biggest ones (5 tons & 2,5 tons) with 6 persons… At the end of the day, the leader of the handlers says :”OK, tomorrow for the other ones, we come with “Kojaks”…” – “Ko-WHAT ?????”….Now I know…..

  612. KJ says:

    I work for a history museum that shares an atrium with a car museum. We had an old car that we had to move from one end of our museum to another, taking off doors in the process so that it would fit. Someone had to sit inside and steer, we had to lift and pivot at points…all in all, it took half a dozen of us over two hours to move the car. At the end of our task, one of the curators from the car museum came over and simply asked, “Why didn’t you just borrow our go-jacks?” *sigh*

  613. KJ says:

    I work for a history museum that shares an atrium with a car museum. We had an old car that we had to move from one end of our museum to another, taking off doors in the process so that it would fit. Someone had to sit inside and steer, we had to lift and pivot at points…all in all, it took half a dozen of us over two hours to move the car. At the end of our task, one of the curators from the car museum came over and simply asked, “Why didn’t you just borrow our go-jacks?” *sigh*

  614. KJ says:

    I work for a history museum that shares an atrium with a car museum. We had an old car that we had to move from one end of our museum to another, taking off doors in the process so that it would fit. Someone had to sit inside and steer, we had to lift and pivot at points…all in all, it took half a dozen of us over two hours to move the car. At the end of our task, one of the curators from the car museum came over and simply asked, “Why didn’t you just borrow our go-jacks?” *sigh*

  615. KJ says:

    I work for a history museum that shares an atrium with a car museum. We had an old car that we had to move from one end of our museum to another, taking off doors in the process so that it would fit. Someone had to sit inside and steer, we had to lift and pivot at points…all in all, it took half a dozen of us over two hours to move the car. At the end of our task, one of the curators from the car museum came over and simply asked, “Why didn’t you just borrow our go-jacks?” *sigh*

  616. Anne Lane says:

    Is that really a q-tip (cotton swab) sticking up out of the little gadget you made? My dad would have been all over the Arduino. If he were still here among us, there would have been blinking lights all over the house, in the car, who knows, fastened to the cats. Sounds like great fun.

    • Angela says:

      Oh no, it’s a very special, cozy restart-device! No, actually it’s a q-tip. This logger was an urgent call from our conservators in need of a logger and when I made a case for it I realized that it was impossible to reach the restart button inside without having to take the whole thing apart. I first drilled a hole in the case so you could restart it with a pencil (remember the old days, when this was the way you could restart a PC?). Re-considering that you probably don’t have a pencil at hand when you need it the most I searched for some replacement for the pencil and the first thing I found was a q-tip. I glued a small plactic piece on the other side of the q-tip so it hits the button reliably. In addition I think “just hit the q-tip for restart” is a great thing to read in a user’s manual. 😉

    • Angela says:

      Oh no, it’s a very special, cozy restart-device! No, actually it’s a q-tip. This logger was an urgent call from our conservators in need of a logger and when I made a case for it I realized that it was impossible to reach the restart button inside without having to take the whole thing apart. I first drilled a hole in the case so you could restart it with a pencil (remember the old days, when this was the way you could restart a PC?). Re-considering that you probably don’t have a pencil at hand when you need it the most I searched for some replacement for the pencil and the first thing I found was a q-tip. I glued a small plactic piece on the other side of the q-tip so it hits the button reliably. In addition I think “just hit the q-tip for restart” is a great thing to read in a user’s manual. 😉

    • Angela says:

      Oh no, it’s a very special, cozy restart-device! No, actually it’s a q-tip. This logger was an urgent call from our conservators in need of a logger and when I made a case for it I realized that it was impossible to reach the restart button inside without having to take the whole thing apart. I first drilled a hole in the case so you could restart it with a pencil (remember the old days, when this was the way you could restart a PC?). Re-considering that you probably don’t have a pencil at hand when you need it the most I searched for some replacement for the pencil and the first thing I found was a q-tip. I glued a small plactic piece on the other side of the q-tip so it hits the button reliably. In addition I think “just hit the q-tip for restart” is a great thing to read in a user’s manual. 😉

    • Angela says:

      Oh no, it’s a very special, cozy restart-device! No, actually it’s a q-tip. This logger was an urgent call from our conservators in need of a logger and when I made a case for it I realized that it was impossible to reach the restart button inside without having to take the whole thing apart. I first drilled a hole in the case so you could restart it with a pencil (remember the old days, when this was the way you could restart a PC?). Re-considering that you probably don’t have a pencil at hand when you need it the most I searched for some replacement for the pencil and the first thing I found was a q-tip. I glued a small plactic piece on the other side of the q-tip so it hits the button reliably. In addition I think “just hit the q-tip for restart” is a great thing to read in a user’s manual. 😉

    • Angela says:

      Oh no, it’s a very special, cozy restart-device! No, actually it’s a q-tip. This logger was an urgent call from our conservators in need of a logger and when I made a case for it I realized that it was impossible to reach the restart button inside without having to take the whole thing apart. I first drilled a hole in the case so you could restart it with a pencil (remember the old days, when this was the way you could restart a PC?). Re-considering that you probably don’t have a pencil at hand when you need it the most I searched for some replacement for the pencil and the first thing I found was a q-tip. I glued a small plactic piece on the other side of the q-tip so it hits the button reliably. In addition I think “just hit the q-tip for restart” is a great thing to read in a user’s manual. 😉

  617. Anne Lane says:

    Is that really a q-tip (cotton swab) sticking up out of the little gadget you made? My dad would have been all over the Arduino. If he were still here among us, there would have been blinking lights all over the house, in the car, who knows, fastened to the cats. Sounds like great fun.

  618. Anne Lane says:

    Is that really a q-tip (cotton swab) sticking up out of the little gadget you made? My dad would have been all over the Arduino. If he were still here among us, there would have been blinking lights all over the house, in the car, who knows, fastened to the cats. Sounds like great fun.

  619. Anne Lane says:

    Is that really a q-tip (cotton swab) sticking up out of the little gadget you made? My dad would have been all over the Arduino. If he were still here among us, there would have been blinking lights all over the house, in the car, who knows, fastened to the cats. Sounds like great fun.

  620. Anne Lane says:

    Is that really a q-tip (cotton swab) sticking up out of the little gadget you made? My dad would have been all over the Arduino. If he were still here among us, there would have been blinking lights all over the house, in the car, who knows, fastened to the cats. Sounds like great fun.

  621. Peter Klein says:

    I accepted a request from members of the Island Church Foundation to serve as s Board Member and as an advisor to the Board. The Board is commited to establishing a climate controlled display space, including a work area and storage area in a building separate from Saint Wenceslaus Church.
    The Board Also committed itself to search for students, who will be considered as equal to adults volunteers.
    This is a huge committment from the Island Church Foundation for insuring the future if its heritage. The Bosrd is also working with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in creating an Intern position with a stipend to assust with the cataloging the current collections of the Foundation.
    This is an exciting time to work for the future of the Foundstion.

    • Angela says:

      Hi Peter,

      so glad to hear your institution is moving forward in collections care. This is a huge achievement. Congratulations!

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi Peter,

      so glad to hear your institution is moving forward in collections care. This is a huge achievement. Congratulations!

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi Peter,

      so glad to hear your institution is moving forward in collections care. This is a huge achievement. Congratulations!

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi Peter,

      so glad to hear your institution is moving forward in collections care. This is a huge achievement. Congratulations!

      Best wishes
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Hi Peter,

      so glad to hear your institution is moving forward in collections care. This is a huge achievement. Congratulations!

      Best wishes
      Angela

  622. Peter Klein says:

    I accepted a request from members of the Island Church Foundation to serve as s Board Member and as an advisor to the Board. The Board is commited to establishing a climate controlled display space, including a work area and storage area in a building separate from Saint Wenceslaus Church.
    The Board Also committed itself to search for students, who will be considered as equal to adults volunteers.
    This is a huge committment from the Island Church Foundation for insuring the future if its heritage. The Bosrd is also working with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in creating an Intern position with a stipend to assust with the cataloging the current collections of the Foundation.
    This is an exciting time to work for the future of the Foundstion.

  623. Peter Klein says:

    I accepted a request from members of the Island Church Foundation to serve as s Board Member and as an advisor to the Board. The Board is commited to establishing a climate controlled display space, including a work area and storage area in a building separate from Saint Wenceslaus Church.
    The Board Also committed itself to search for students, who will be considered as equal to adults volunteers.
    This is a huge committment from the Island Church Foundation for insuring the future if its heritage. The Bosrd is also working with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in creating an Intern position with a stipend to assust with the cataloging the current collections of the Foundation.
    This is an exciting time to work for the future of the Foundstion.

  624. Peter Klein says:

    I accepted a request from members of the Island Church Foundation to serve as s Board Member and as an advisor to the Board. The Board is commited to establishing a climate controlled display space, including a work area and storage area in a building separate from Saint Wenceslaus Church.
    The Board Also committed itself to search for students, who will be considered as equal to adults volunteers.
    This is a huge committment from the Island Church Foundation for insuring the future if its heritage. The Bosrd is also working with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in creating an Intern position with a stipend to assust with the cataloging the current collections of the Foundation.
    This is an exciting time to work for the future of the Foundstion.

  625. Peter Klein says:

    I accepted a request from members of the Island Church Foundation to serve as s Board Member and as an advisor to the Board. The Board is commited to establishing a climate controlled display space, including a work area and storage area in a building separate from Saint Wenceslaus Church.
    The Board Also committed itself to search for students, who will be considered as equal to adults volunteers.
    This is a huge committment from the Island Church Foundation for insuring the future if its heritage. The Bosrd is also working with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in creating an Intern position with a stipend to assust with the cataloging the current collections of the Foundation.
    This is an exciting time to work for the future of the Foundstion.

  626. Anne Lane says:

    Ah, I see. Put unwanted emails into properly labeled old unwanted crates and, and . . . I could use the crate as a planting container in my garden! Old emails don’t take up much room, might help with drainage.

    • Angela says:

      See how easy it is?
      To think that I passed this crate for over a month without discovering what a gem it is. Our chemist got the idea the very moment he saw it….

    • Angela says:

      See how easy it is?
      To think that I passed this crate for over a month without discovering what a gem it is. Our chemist got the idea the very moment he saw it….

    • Angela says:

      See how easy it is?
      To think that I passed this crate for over a month without discovering what a gem it is. Our chemist got the idea the very moment he saw it….

    • Angela says:

      See how easy it is?
      To think that I passed this crate for over a month without discovering what a gem it is. Our chemist got the idea the very moment he saw it….

    • Angela says:

      See how easy it is?
      To think that I passed this crate for over a month without discovering what a gem it is. Our chemist got the idea the very moment he saw it….

  627. Anne Lane says:

    Ah, I see. Put unwanted emails into properly labeled old unwanted crates and, and . . . I could use the crate as a planting container in my garden! Old emails don’t take up much room, might help with drainage.

  628. Anne Lane says:

    Ah, I see. Put unwanted emails into properly labeled old unwanted crates and, and . . . I could use the crate as a planting container in my garden! Old emails don’t take up much room, might help with drainage.

  629. Anne Lane says:

    Ah, I see. Put unwanted emails into properly labeled old unwanted crates and, and . . . I could use the crate as a planting container in my garden! Old emails don’t take up much room, might help with drainage.

  630. Anne Lane says:

    Ah, I see. Put unwanted emails into properly labeled old unwanted crates and, and . . . I could use the crate as a planting container in my garden! Old emails don’t take up much room, might help with drainage.

  631. Sharon McCullar says:

    Congratulations on the project! Very elegant and simple solution to the situation. The Museum looks to have a sustainable system to move forward with thanks to the effort put into the initial cataloging and description effort. Very glad the Museum stakeholders had the foresight to allow the “nuts and bolts” of inventory,cataloging, photography and numbering to happen during a closed period. They will reap the benefits for a long time in terms of ease of access and ease of sustaining the system. Great article on the process.

  632. Sharon McCullar says:

    Congratulations on the project! Very elegant and simple solution to the situation. The Museum looks to have a sustainable system to move forward with thanks to the effort put into the initial cataloging and description effort. Very glad the Museum stakeholders had the foresight to allow the “nuts and bolts” of inventory,cataloging, photography and numbering to happen during a closed period. They will reap the benefits for a long time in terms of ease of access and ease of sustaining the system. Great article on the process.

  633. Sharon McCullar says:

    Congratulations on the project! Very elegant and simple solution to the situation. The Museum looks to have a sustainable system to move forward with thanks to the effort put into the initial cataloging and description effort. Very glad the Museum stakeholders had the foresight to allow the “nuts and bolts” of inventory,cataloging, photography and numbering to happen during a closed period. They will reap the benefits for a long time in terms of ease of access and ease of sustaining the system. Great article on the process.

  634. Sharon McCullar says:

    Congratulations on the project! Very elegant and simple solution to the situation. The Museum looks to have a sustainable system to move forward with thanks to the effort put into the initial cataloging and description effort. Very glad the Museum stakeholders had the foresight to allow the “nuts and bolts” of inventory,cataloging, photography and numbering to happen during a closed period. They will reap the benefits for a long time in terms of ease of access and ease of sustaining the system. Great article on the process.

  635. Sharon McCullar says:

    Congratulations on the project! Very elegant and simple solution to the situation. The Museum looks to have a sustainable system to move forward with thanks to the effort put into the initial cataloging and description effort. Very glad the Museum stakeholders had the foresight to allow the “nuts and bolts” of inventory,cataloging, photography and numbering to happen during a closed period. They will reap the benefits for a long time in terms of ease of access and ease of sustaining the system. Great article on the process.

  636. Evelyn says:

    Yep I carry tape measure, scissors, flashlight, archival marking pen, nail polish (sorry we do it the old way) and liquid label in my purse.

  637. Evelyn says:

    Yep I carry tape measure, scissors, flashlight, archival marking pen, nail polish (sorry we do it the old way) and liquid label in my purse.

  638. Evelyn says:

    Yep I carry tape measure, scissors, flashlight, archival marking pen, nail polish (sorry we do it the old way) and liquid label in my purse.

  639. Evelyn says:

    Yep I carry tape measure, scissors, flashlight, archival marking pen, nail polish (sorry we do it the old way) and liquid label in my purse.

  640. Evelyn says:

    Yep I carry tape measure, scissors, flashlight, archival marking pen, nail polish (sorry we do it the old way) and liquid label in my purse.

  641. I ordered my copy last week. Can’t wait for it to arrive!

    • Angela says:

      Thanks. I really hope you like it. I feel a special obligation to the readers of this blog as you all supported this project with your comments and support!
      cheers,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Thanks. I really hope you like it. I feel a special obligation to the readers of this blog as you all supported this project with your comments and support!
      cheers,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Thanks. I really hope you like it. I feel a special obligation to the readers of this blog as you all supported this project with your comments and support!
      cheers,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Thanks. I really hope you like it. I feel a special obligation to the readers of this blog as you all supported this project with your comments and support!
      cheers,
      Angela

    • Angela says:

      Thanks. I really hope you like it. I feel a special obligation to the readers of this blog as you all supported this project with your comments and support!
      cheers,
      Angela

  642. I ordered my copy last week. Can’t wait for it to arrive!

  643. I ordered my copy last week. Can’t wait for it to arrive!

  644. I ordered my copy last week. Can’t wait for it to arrive!

  645. I ordered my copy last week. Can’t wait for it to arrive!

  646. Anne Lane says:

    Angela, I’m afraid that “numbers, spellbound by” will have to stay. Although perhaps “confounded by” or “bamfoozled by” or “head-scratchingly befuddled by” might also work. Good luck with the “process, unforeseen complications thereof!”
    Anne

  647. Anne Lane says:

    Angela, I’m afraid that “numbers, spellbound by” will have to stay. Although perhaps “confounded by” or “bamfoozled by” or “head-scratchingly befuddled by” might also work. Good luck with the “process, unforeseen complications thereof!”
    Anne

  648. Anne Lane says:

    Angela, I’m afraid that “numbers, spellbound by” will have to stay. Although perhaps “confounded by” or “bamfoozled by” or “head-scratchingly befuddled by” might also work. Good luck with the “process, unforeseen complications thereof!”
    Anne

  649. Anne Lane says:

    Angela, I’m afraid that “numbers, spellbound by” will have to stay. Although perhaps “confounded by” or “bamfoozled by” or “head-scratchingly befuddled by” might also work. Good luck with the “process, unforeseen complications thereof!”
    Anne

  650. Anne Lane says:

    Angela, I’m afraid that “numbers, spellbound by” will have to stay. Although perhaps “confounded by” or “bamfoozled by” or “head-scratchingly befuddled by” might also work. Good luck with the “process, unforeseen complications thereof!”
    Anne

  651. Kathy Karkut says:

    Wonderful idea to share this drawing! No one outside of collections staff really knows how far we will go to prepare supports and packaging to keep our collections safe! I think o fit as one of the perks of the job to create custom supports!

    • Angela says:

      Yeah, like: okay, this is going to be dirty, dusty and you are mainly pushing a rock uphill. But: you can build as many custom boxes as you like. Deal?

    • Angela says:

      Yeah, like: okay, this is going to be dirty, dusty and you are mainly pushing a rock uphill. But: you can build as many custom boxes as you like. Deal?

    • Angela says:

      Yeah, like: okay, this is going to be dirty, dusty and you are mainly pushing a rock uphill. But: you can build as many custom boxes as you like. Deal?

    • Angela says:

      Yeah, like: okay, this is going to be dirty, dusty and you are mainly pushing a rock uphill. But: you can build as many custom boxes as you like. Deal?

    • Angela says:

      Yeah, like: okay, this is going to be dirty, dusty and you are mainly pushing a rock uphill. But: you can build as many custom boxes as you like. Deal?

  652. Kathy Karkut says:

    Wonderful idea to share this drawing! No one outside of collections staff really knows how far we will go to prepare supports and packaging to keep our collections safe! I think o fit as one of the perks of the job to create custom supports!

  653. Kathy Karkut says:

    Wonderful idea to share this drawing! No one outside of collections staff really knows how far we will go to prepare supports and packaging to keep our collections safe! I think o fit as one of the perks of the job to create custom supports!

  654. Kathy Karkut says:

    Wonderful idea to share this drawing! No one outside of collections staff really knows how far we will go to prepare supports and packaging to keep our collections safe! I think o fit as one of the perks of the job to create custom supports!

  655. Kathy Karkut says:

    Wonderful idea to share this drawing! No one outside of collections staff really knows how far we will go to prepare supports and packaging to keep our collections safe! I think o fit as one of the perks of the job to create custom supports!

  656. Anne Lane says:

    Very nice. Much tidier than my scrawly diagrams. What kinds of materials / adhesives / padding do y’all use for this kind of container?
    Anne

  657. Anne Lane says:

    Very nice. Much tidier than my scrawly diagrams. What kinds of materials / adhesives / padding do y’all use for this kind of container?
    Anne

  658. Anne Lane says:

    Very nice. Much tidier than my scrawly diagrams. What kinds of materials / adhesives / padding do y’all use for this kind of container?
    Anne

  659. Anne Lane says:

    Very nice. Much tidier than my scrawly diagrams. What kinds of materials / adhesives / padding do y’all use for this kind of container?
    Anne

  660. Anne Lane says:

    Very nice. Much tidier than my scrawly diagrams. What kinds of materials / adhesives / padding do y’all use for this kind of container?
    Anne

  661. Peter Klein says:

    A great little mystery that I experienced when I forgot I had a logger in my hand from another storage room through a hallway to another room. The hallway is not climate controlled and created another variable that I could not explain. It took me days to solve the mystery.

  662. Peter Klein says:

    A great little mystery that I experienced when I forgot I had a logger in my hand from another storage room through a hallway to another room. The hallway is not climate controlled and created another variable that I could not explain. It took me days to solve the mystery.

  663. Peter Klein says:

    A great little mystery that I experienced when I forgot I had a logger in my hand from another storage room through a hallway to another room. The hallway is not climate controlled and created another variable that I could not explain. It took me days to solve the mystery.

  664. Peter Klein says:

    A great little mystery that I experienced when I forgot I had a logger in my hand from another storage room through a hallway to another room. The hallway is not climate controlled and created another variable that I could not explain. It took me days to solve the mystery.

  665. Peter Klein says:

    A great little mystery that I experienced when I forgot I had a logger in my hand from another storage room through a hallway to another room. The hallway is not climate controlled and created another variable that I could not explain. It took me days to solve the mystery.

  666. Thorsten says:

    Angela, du gehst dorthin, wo noch kein Registrar jemals zuvor gewesen ist…
    Schöne Idee und schöne Seite. Wissädälerisch zählt wohl nicht als neue Sprache in die ich übersetzen helfen könnte.

  667. Thorsten says:

    Angela, du gehst dorthin, wo noch kein Registrar jemals zuvor gewesen ist…
    Schöne Idee und schöne Seite. Wissädälerisch zählt wohl nicht als neue Sprache in die ich übersetzen helfen könnte.

  668. Thorsten says:

    Angela, du gehst dorthin, wo noch kein Registrar jemals zuvor gewesen ist…
    Schöne Idee und schöne Seite. Wissädälerisch zählt wohl nicht als neue Sprache in die ich übersetzen helfen könnte.

  669. Thorsten says:

    Angela, du gehst dorthin, wo noch kein Registrar jemals zuvor gewesen ist…
    Schöne Idee und schöne Seite. Wissädälerisch zählt wohl nicht als neue Sprache in die ich übersetzen helfen könnte.

  670. Thorsten says:

    Angela, du gehst dorthin, wo noch kein Registrar jemals zuvor gewesen ist…
    Schöne Idee und schöne Seite. Wissädälerisch zählt wohl nicht als neue Sprache in die ich übersetzen helfen könnte.

  671. Michael Hall says:

    I would suggest that the logger was actually removed from it’s original location. The changes in humidity are being driven by the changes in temperature. Looking at the conditions before and after the fluctuations the conditions are fairly stable. The sudden change in temperature could be caused by someone accidentally putting the logger into their bag that has come from a warmer environment, walked out of the building allowing the temperature to cool, then got in a car,driven home with the air con on, got home at about 17:30, the car is left in the evening sunlight allowing the car to warm up before the sun disappears giving a gradual cool down overnight. At 07:30 next morning, the person drives into work, realises they have taken the logger home and puts it back in situ.

  672. Michael Hall says:

    I would suggest that the logger was actually removed from it’s original location. The changes in humidity are being driven by the changes in temperature. Looking at the conditions before and after the fluctuations the conditions are fairly stable. The sudden change in temperature could be caused by someone accidentally putting the logger into their bag that has come from a warmer environment, walked out of the building allowing the temperature to cool, then got in a car,driven home with the air con on, got home at about 17:30, the car is left in the evening sunlight allowing the car to warm up before the sun disappears giving a gradual cool down overnight. At 07:30 next morning, the person drives into work, realises they have taken the logger home and puts it back in situ.

  673. Michael Hall says:

    I would suggest that the logger was actually removed from it’s original location. The changes in humidity are being driven by the changes in temperature. Looking at the conditions before and after the fluctuations the conditions are fairly stable. The sudden change in temperature could be caused by someone accidentally putting the logger into their bag that has come from a warmer environment, walked out of the building allowing the temperature to cool, then got in a car,driven home with the air con on, got home at about 17:30, the car is left in the evening sunlight allowing the car to warm up before the sun disappears giving a gradual cool down overnight. At 07:30 next morning, the person drives into work, realises they have taken the logger home and puts it back in situ.

  674. Michael Hall says:

    I would suggest that the logger was actually removed from it’s original location. The changes in humidity are being driven by the changes in temperature. Looking at the conditions before and after the fluctuations the conditions are fairly stable. The sudden change in temperature could be caused by someone accidentally putting the logger into their bag that has come from a warmer environment, walked out of the building allowing the temperature to cool, then got in a car,driven home with the air con on, got home at about 17:30, the car is left in the evening sunlight allowing the car to warm up before the sun disappears giving a gradual cool down overnight. At 07:30 next morning, the person drives into work, realises they have taken the logger home and puts it back in situ.

  675. Michael Hall says:

    I would suggest that the logger was actually removed from it’s original location. The changes in humidity are being driven by the changes in temperature. Looking at the conditions before and after the fluctuations the conditions are fairly stable. The sudden change in temperature could be caused by someone accidentally putting the logger into their bag that has come from a warmer environment, walked out of the building allowing the temperature to cool, then got in a car,driven home with the air con on, got home at about 17:30, the car is left in the evening sunlight allowing the car to warm up before the sun disappears giving a gradual cool down overnight. At 07:30 next morning, the person drives into work, realises they have taken the logger home and puts it back in situ.

  676. Pat says:

    There was marked solar flare activity from Sept 1 to Spet3 2013. Could that have had anything to do with disrupting the datalogger readings?

  677. Pat says:

    There was marked solar flare activity from Sept 1 to Spet3 2013. Could that have had anything to do with disrupting the datalogger readings?

  678. Pat says:

    There was marked solar flare activity from Sept 1 to Spet3 2013. Could that have had anything to do with disrupting the datalogger readings?

  679. Pat says:

    There was marked solar flare activity from Sept 1 to Spet3 2013. Could that have had anything to do with disrupting the datalogger readings?

  680. Pat says:

    There was marked solar flare activity from Sept 1 to Spet3 2013. Could that have had anything to do with disrupting the datalogger readings?

  681. paul mcauley says:

    I agree with Kathy Karkut, something has fallen over the datalogger unit creating a microclimate – a sheet of bubble wrap or tissue – or some creature has interfered with the sensor – or maybe there is a ghost in the machine…

  682. paul mcauley says:

    I agree with Kathy Karkut, something has fallen over the datalogger unit creating a microclimate – a sheet of bubble wrap or tissue – or some creature has interfered with the sensor – or maybe there is a ghost in the machine…

  683. paul mcauley says:

    I agree with Kathy Karkut, something has fallen over the datalogger unit creating a microclimate – a sheet of bubble wrap or tissue – or some creature has interfered with the sensor – or maybe there is a ghost in the machine…

  684. paul mcauley says:

    I agree with Kathy Karkut, something has fallen over the datalogger unit creating a microclimate – a sheet of bubble wrap or tissue – or some creature has interfered with the sensor – or maybe there is a ghost in the machine…

  685. paul mcauley says:

    I agree with Kathy Karkut, something has fallen over the datalogger unit creating a microclimate – a sheet of bubble wrap or tissue – or some creature has interfered with the sensor – or maybe there is a ghost in the machine…

  686. Hugh Glover says:

    A staff member did something dry as they left for home and undid it when they arrived in the morning;not sure what they did though!

  687. Hugh Glover says:

    A staff member did something dry as they left for home and undid it when they arrived in the morning;not sure what they did though!

  688. Hugh Glover says:

    A staff member did something dry as they left for home and undid it when they arrived in the morning;not sure what they did though!

  689. Hugh Glover says:

    A staff member did something dry as they left for home and undid it when they arrived in the morning;not sure what they did though!

  690. Hugh Glover says:

    A staff member did something dry as they left for home and undid it when they arrived in the morning;not sure what they did though!

  691. Chris Au says:

    My first avenue of inquiry would be to confirm the integrity of the datalogger; was the data compromised in its collection, interpretation, storage or transmission?

    Secondly, was there any other evidence of the T and RH fluctuation?

    Thirdly, what are the items in storage? Could anything there be a cause?

    Perhaps there would be clues in those answers.

  692. Chris Au says:

    My first avenue of inquiry would be to confirm the integrity of the datalogger; was the data compromised in its collection, interpretation, storage or transmission?

    Secondly, was there any other evidence of the T and RH fluctuation?

    Thirdly, what are the items in storage? Could anything there be a cause?

    Perhaps there would be clues in those answers.

  693. Chris Au says:

    My first avenue of inquiry would be to confirm the integrity of the datalogger; was the data compromised in its collection, interpretation, storage or transmission?

    Secondly, was there any other evidence of the T and RH fluctuation?

    Thirdly, what are the items in storage? Could anything there be a cause?

    Perhaps there would be clues in those answers.

  694. Chris Au says:

    My first avenue of inquiry would be to confirm the integrity of the datalogger; was the data compromised in its collection, interpretation, storage or transmission?

    Secondly, was there any other evidence of the T and RH fluctuation?

    Thirdly, what are the items in storage? Could anything there be a cause?

    Perhaps there would be clues in those answers.

  695. Chris Au says:

    My first avenue of inquiry would be to confirm the integrity of the datalogger; was the data compromised in its collection, interpretation, storage or transmission?

    Secondly, was there any other evidence of the T and RH fluctuation?

    Thirdly, what are the items in storage? Could anything there be a cause?

    Perhaps there would be clues in those answers.

  696. Kathy Karkut says:

    Potentially something was dropped over the data logger such as a box or bubble pack, etc. and the readings are for a very small contained space surrounding the DL. The next time someone was near the DL they removed the covering.

  697. Kathy Karkut says:

    Potentially something was dropped over the data logger such as a box or bubble pack, etc. and the readings are for a very small contained space surrounding the DL. The next time someone was near the DL they removed the covering.

  698. Kathy Karkut says:

    Potentially something was dropped over the data logger such as a box or bubble pack, etc. and the readings are for a very small contained space surrounding the DL. The next time someone was near the DL they removed the covering.

  699. Kathy Karkut says:

    Potentially something was dropped over the data logger such as a box or bubble pack, etc. and the readings are for a very small contained space surrounding the DL. The next time someone was near the DL they removed the covering.

  700. Kathy Karkut says:

    Potentially something was dropped over the data logger such as a box or bubble pack, etc. and the readings are for a very small contained space surrounding the DL. The next time someone was near the DL they removed the covering.

  701. I would think someone took the datalogger to another room (warmer, dryer) and then maybe outside in the car for a night, to put it back the 3th september…?

    Geert Bellens
    Metiz

  702. I would think someone took the datalogger to another room (warmer, dryer) and then maybe outside in the car for a night, to put it back the 3th september…?

    Geert Bellens
    Metiz

  703. I would think someone took the datalogger to another room (warmer, dryer) and then maybe outside in the car for a night, to put it back the 3th september…?

    Geert Bellens
    Metiz

  704. I would think someone took the datalogger to another room (warmer, dryer) and then maybe outside in the car for a night, to put it back the 3th september…?

    Geert Bellens
    Metiz

  705. I would think someone took the datalogger to another room (warmer, dryer) and then maybe outside in the car for a night, to put it back the 3th september…?

    Geert Bellens
    Metiz

  706. Angela,

    If someone was breathing close to the logger, the temperature would rise at 16u30, but humidity also.

    If a heat source was involved (local heater, lamp,..) I would expect rising temperatures, and lower humidity, but no that drastically.

  707. Angela,

    If someone was breathing close to the logger, the temperature would rise at 16u30, but humidity also.

    If a heat source was involved (local heater, lamp,..) I would expect rising temperatures, and lower humidity, but no that drastically.

  708. Angela,

    If someone was breathing close to the logger, the temperature would rise at 16u30, but humidity also.

    If a heat source was involved (local heater, lamp,..) I would expect rising temperatures, and lower humidity, but no that drastically.

  709. Angela,

    If someone was breathing close to the logger, the temperature would rise at 16u30, but humidity also.

    If a heat source was involved (local heater, lamp,..) I would expect rising temperatures, and lower humidity, but no that drastically.

  710. Angela,

    If someone was breathing close to the logger, the temperature would rise at 16u30, but humidity also.

    If a heat source was involved (local heater, lamp,..) I would expect rising temperatures, and lower humidity, but no that drastically.

  711. Christian Baars says:

    The weather was mild during early September 2013, with daytime temperature at around 24 deg C. However, yourT changes are too rapid to be caused by normal daily fluctuations. The RH changes in this case are counter correlated with your T changes, which suggests that something affected T but confirms you have no independent RH control. As you say there is no HVAC an equipment malfunction can be excluded. Something lead to the steady then rapid T increase, then slow drop during thenight, followed by rapid normalisation of conditions. Do you have central heating in the building which came on, the store got too warm, someone opened a window in the evening of the 2nd which was left open over night then closed in the morning of the 3rd?

    • Angela says:

      Your considerations regarding the daytime temperature are correct, as you can see by the weather dates of the nearby weather station: http://archiv.mannheim-wetter.info/2013/pcws/20130902.gif
      The steady increase until about 16:30 is pretty normal, regarding the outside temperatures and the nearly not insulated storage, nothing to be proud of, but nothing to be particularily concerned about.
      I like your idea with the central heating gone mad, we have one but it wasn’t turned on because of the rather mild temperatures. And no, no one opened a window to regulate the temperature.

    • Angela says:

      Your considerations regarding the daytime temperature are correct, as you can see by the weather dates of the nearby weather station: http://archiv.mannheim-wetter.info/2013/pcws/20130902.gif
      The steady increase until about 16:30 is pretty normal, regarding the outside temperatures and the nearly not insulated storage, nothing to be proud of, but nothing to be particularily concerned about.
      I like your idea with the central heating gone mad, we have one but it wasn’t turned on because of the rather mild temperatures. And no, no one opened a window to regulate the temperature.

    • Angela says:

      Your considerations regarding the daytime temperature are correct, as you can see by the weather dates of the nearby weather station: http://archiv.mannheim-wetter.info/2013/pcws/20130902.gif
      The steady increase until about 16:30 is pretty normal, regarding the outside temperatures and the nearly not insulated storage, nothing to be proud of, but nothing to be particularily concerned about.
      I like your idea with the central heating gone mad, we have one but it wasn’t turned on because of the rather mild temperatures. And no, no one opened a window to regulate the temperature.

    • Angela says:

      Your considerations regarding the daytime temperature are correct, as you can see by the weather dates of the nearby weather station: http://archiv.mannheim-wetter.info/2013/pcws/20130902.gif
      The steady increase until about 16:30 is pretty normal, regarding the outside temperatures and the nearly not insulated storage, nothing to be proud of, but nothing to be particularily concerned about.
      I like your idea with the central heating gone mad, we have one but it wasn’t turned on because of the rather mild temperatures. And no, no one opened a window to regulate the temperature.

    • Angela says:

      Your considerations regarding the daytime temperature are correct, as you can see by the weather dates of the nearby weather station: http://archiv.mannheim-wetter.info/2013/pcws/20130902.gif
      The steady increase until about 16:30 is pretty normal, regarding the outside temperatures and the nearly not insulated storage, nothing to be proud of, but nothing to be particularily concerned about.
      I like your idea with the central heating gone mad, we have one but it wasn’t turned on because of the rather mild temperatures. And no, no one opened a window to regulate the temperature.

  712. Christian Baars says:

    The weather was mild during early September 2013, with daytime temperature at around 24 deg C. However, yourT changes are too rapid to be caused by normal daily fluctuations. The RH changes in this case are counter correlated with your T changes, which suggests that something affected T but confirms you have no independent RH control. As you say there is no HVAC an equipment malfunction can be excluded. Something lead to the steady then rapid T increase, then slow drop during thenight, followed by rapid normalisation of conditions. Do you have central heating in the building which came on, the store got too warm, someone opened a window in the evening of the 2nd which was left open over night then closed in the morning of the 3rd?

  713. Christian Baars says:

    The weather was mild during early September 2013, with daytime temperature at around 24 deg C. However, yourT changes are too rapid to be caused by normal daily fluctuations. The RH changes in this case are counter correlated with your T changes, which suggests that something affected T but confirms you have no independent RH control. As you say there is no HVAC an equipment malfunction can be excluded. Something lead to the steady then rapid T increase, then slow drop during thenight, followed by rapid normalisation of conditions. Do you have central heating in the building which came on, the store got too warm, someone opened a window in the evening of the 2nd which was left open over night then closed in the morning of the 3rd?

  714. Christian Baars says:

    The weather was mild during early September 2013, with daytime temperature at around 24 deg C. However, yourT changes are too rapid to be caused by normal daily fluctuations. The RH changes in this case are counter correlated with your T changes, which suggests that something affected T but confirms you have no independent RH control. As you say there is no HVAC an equipment malfunction can be excluded. Something lead to the steady then rapid T increase, then slow drop during thenight, followed by rapid normalisation of conditions. Do you have central heating in the building which came on, the store got too warm, someone opened a window in the evening of the 2nd which was left open over night then closed in the morning of the 3rd?

  715. Christian Baars says:

    The weather was mild during early September 2013, with daytime temperature at around 24 deg C. However, yourT changes are too rapid to be caused by normal daily fluctuations. The RH changes in this case are counter correlated with your T changes, which suggests that something affected T but confirms you have no independent RH control. As you say there is no HVAC an equipment malfunction can be excluded. Something lead to the steady then rapid T increase, then slow drop during thenight, followed by rapid normalisation of conditions. Do you have central heating in the building which came on, the store got too warm, someone opened a window in the evening of the 2nd which was left open over night then closed in the morning of the 3rd?

  716. […] Registrar Trek: The Next Generation: How NOT to number objects […]

  717. […] Registrar Trek: The Next Generation: How NOT to number objects […]

  718. […] Registrar Trek: The Next Generation: How NOT to number objects […]

  719. […] Registrar Trek: The Next Generation: How NOT to number objects […]

  720. […] Registrar Trek: The Next Generation: How NOT to number objects […]

  721. Helena says:

    Hi, dear Angela!
    With great pleasure I read about Your project through LinkedIn. Your activity seems very significant for the Museum community. I work in the position of scientific secretary at the All-Russian Decorative-applied and Folk Art Museum (vmdpni.ru). I’d be happy to help in texts translation from English into Russian.
    With best regards,
    Helena

  722. Helena says:

    Hi, dear Angela!
    With great pleasure I read about Your project through LinkedIn. Your activity seems very significant for the Museum community. I work in the position of scientific secretary at the All-Russian Decorative-applied and Folk Art Museum (vmdpni.ru). I’d be happy to help in texts translation from English into Russian.
    With best regards,
    Helena

  723. Helena says:

    Hi, dear Angela!
    With great pleasure I read about Your project through LinkedIn. Your activity seems very significant for the Museum community. I work in the position of scientific secretary at the All-Russian Decorative-applied and Folk Art Museum (vmdpni.ru). I’d be happy to help in texts translation from English into Russian.
    With best regards,
    Helena

  724. Helena says:

    Hi, dear Angela!
    With great pleasure I read about Your project through LinkedIn. Your activity seems very significant for the Museum community. I work in the position of scientific secretary at the All-Russian Decorative-applied and Folk Art Museum (vmdpni.ru). I’d be happy to help in texts translation from English into Russian.
    With best regards,
    Helena

  725. Helena says:

    Hi, dear Angela!
    With great pleasure I read about Your project through LinkedIn. Your activity seems very significant for the Museum community. I work in the position of scientific secretary at the All-Russian Decorative-applied and Folk Art Museum (vmdpni.ru). I’d be happy to help in texts translation from English into Russian.
    With best regards,
    Helena

  726. […] From Plant Press, Vol. 17, No. 4, October 2014. Cleared Leaf Image Database. Search. Help Clicking in any form field displays a list of available values for that field. The list is filtered based upon values in all non-empty fields. National Cleared Leaf Collection – Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. IMITATION OF LIFE – A VISUAL CATALOGUE. How NOT to number objects | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation. […]

  727. […] From Plant Press, Vol. 17, No. 4, October 2014. Cleared Leaf Image Database. Search. Help Clicking in any form field displays a list of available values for that field. The list is filtered based upon values in all non-empty fields. National Cleared Leaf Collection – Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. IMITATION OF LIFE – A VISUAL CATALOGUE. How NOT to number objects | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation. […]

  728. […] From Plant Press, Vol. 17, No. 4, October 2014. Cleared Leaf Image Database. Search. Help Clicking in any form field displays a list of available values for that field. The list is filtered based upon values in all non-empty fields. National Cleared Leaf Collection – Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. IMITATION OF LIFE – A VISUAL CATALOGUE. How NOT to number objects | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation. […]

  729. […] From Plant Press, Vol. 17, No. 4, October 2014. Cleared Leaf Image Database. Search. Help Clicking in any form field displays a list of available values for that field. The list is filtered based upon values in all non-empty fields. National Cleared Leaf Collection – Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. IMITATION OF LIFE – A VISUAL CATALOGUE. How NOT to number objects | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation. […]

  730. […] From Plant Press, Vol. 17, No. 4, October 2014. Cleared Leaf Image Database. Search. Help Clicking in any form field displays a list of available values for that field. The list is filtered based upon values in all non-empty fields. National Cleared Leaf Collection – Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. IMITATION OF LIFE – A VISUAL CATALOGUE. How NOT to number objects | Registrar Trek: The Next Generation. […]

  731. I just saw the film. I am intrigued by the question of whether Landis’s actions have been harmful, or not. The passion displayed on this very page is proof that others are intrigued as well. Speaking of due diligence let me say up front that I have not read the piece in the Financial Times, nor in the New Yorker. I’m hoping that these sources will help me get a handle on the issues.
    For now, though, I can say with certainty that I feel Landis is a dyed-in-the-wool con man. It is amazing the way he lights up in the museum reception scene. One can sense immediately how a museum curator might be taken in. If he is a con man, one can easily find nature or nurture arguments which attempt to explain why this is so, but the fact remains that at the end of the day, we are responsible for our actions. It is simply wrong to defraud others. To fault Leininger because he insists that Landis is a con artist is absurd.
    A question which I hope to resolve by further research is how the big media reported this story, i.e., in what tone, in what depth, and what conclusions they drew, if any, about the case. The film was rather coy about drawing conclusions. They certainly could have made professionals at the major institutions squirm far more than they did. Yet this part of the story (how DO you authenticate artwork?) went unexplored. This lack of reporting on what institutions should have been doing makes Leininger’s taking up the slack more understandable, a point that is made in the film but rather weakly. Landis’s personality, as odd, wandering, and fractured as it is, makes for a compelling subject, and the filmmakers used this to their advantage. The question arises as to whether they were themselves exploiting Landis. I wonder. At the very least, they cast Landis as an idiot savant, which I think is only one of his facets. They certainly let him play to the camera. On the other hand, the filmmakers left plenty of film running so that viewers could make up their own mind as to the man’s character. As I have said, my conclusion is that Mark Landis reveals himself in the film to be an artist, after all. A con artist.

  732. I just saw the film. I am intrigued by the question of whether Landis’s actions have been harmful, or not. The passion displayed on this very page is proof that others are intrigued as well. Speaking of due diligence let me say up front that I have not read the piece in the Financial Times, nor in the New Yorker. I’m hoping that these sources will help me get a handle on the issues.
    For now, though, I can say with certainty that I feel Landis is a dyed-in-the-wool con man. It is amazing the way he lights up in the museum reception scene. One can sense immediately how a museum curator might be taken in. If he is a con man, one can easily find nature or nurture arguments which attempt to explain why this is so, but the fact remains that at the end of the day, we are responsible for our actions. It is simply wrong to defraud others. To fault Leininger because he insists that Landis is a con artist is absurd.
    A question which I hope to resolve by further research is how the big media reported this story, i.e., in what tone, in what depth, and what conclusions they drew, if any, about the case. The film was rather coy about drawing conclusions. They certainly could have made professionals at the major institutions squirm far more than they did. Yet this part of the story (how DO you authenticate artwork?) went unexplored. This lack of reporting on what institutions should have been doing makes Leininger’s taking up the slack more understandable, a point that is made in the film but rather weakly. Landis’s personality, as odd, wandering, and fractured as it is, makes for a compelling subject, and the filmmakers used this to their advantage. The question arises as to whether they were themselves exploiting Landis. I wonder. At the very least, they cast Landis as an idiot savant, which I think is only one of his facets. They certainly let him play to the camera. On the other hand, the filmmakers left plenty of film running so that viewers could make up their own mind as to the man’s character. As I have said, my conclusion is that Mark Landis reveals himself in the film to be an artist, after all. A con artist.

  733. I just saw the film. I am intrigued by the question of whether Landis’s actions have been harmful, or not. The passion displayed on this very page is proof that others are intrigued as well. Speaking of due diligence let me say up front that I have not read the piece in the Financial Times, nor in the New Yorker. I’m hoping that these sources will help me get a handle on the issues.
    For now, though, I can say with certainty that I feel Landis is a dyed-in-the-wool con man. It is amazing the way he lights up in the museum reception scene. One can sense immediately how a museum curator might be taken in. If he is a con man, one can easily find nature or nurture arguments which attempt to explain why this is so, but the fact remains that at the end of the day, we are responsible for our actions. It is simply wrong to defraud others. To fault Leininger because he insists that Landis is a con artist is absurd.
    A question which I hope to resolve by further research is how the big media reported this story, i.e., in what tone, in what depth, and what conclusions they drew, if any, about the case. The film was rather coy about drawing conclusions. They certainly could have made professionals at the major institutions squirm far more than they did. Yet this part of the story (how DO you authenticate artwork?) went unexplored. This lack of reporting on what institutions should have been doing makes Leininger’s taking up the slack more understandable, a point that is made in the film but rather weakly. Landis’s personality, as odd, wandering, and fractured as it is, makes for a compelling subject, and the filmmakers used this to their advantage. The question arises as to whether they were themselves exploiting Landis. I wonder. At the very least, they cast Landis as an idiot savant, which I think is only one of his facets. They certainly let him play to the camera. On the other hand, the filmmakers left plenty of film running so that viewers could make up their own mind as to the man’s character. As I have said, my conclusion is that Mark Landis reveals himself in the film to be an artist, after all. A con artist.

  734. I just saw the film. I am intrigued by the question of whether Landis’s actions have been harmful, or not. The passion displayed on this very page is proof that others are intrigued as well. Speaking of due diligence let me say up front that I have not read the piece in the Financial Times, nor in the New Yorker. I’m hoping that these sources will help me get a handle on the issues.
    For now, though, I can say with certainty that I feel Landis is a dyed-in-the-wool con man. It is amazing the way he lights up in the museum reception scene. One can sense immediately how a museum curator might be taken in. If he is a con man, one can easily find nature or nurture arguments which attempt to explain why this is so, but the fact remains that at the end of the day, we are responsible for our actions. It is simply wrong to defraud others. To fault Leininger because he insists that Landis is a con artist is absurd.
    A question which I hope to resolve by further research is how the big media reported this story, i.e., in what tone, in what depth, and what conclusions they drew, if any, about the case. The film was rather coy about drawing conclusions. They certainly could have made professionals at the major institutions squirm far more than they did. Yet this part of the story (how DO you authenticate artwork?) went unexplored. This lack of reporting on what institutions should have been doing makes Leininger’s taking up the slack more understandable, a point that is made in the film but rather weakly. Landis’s personality, as odd, wandering, and fractured as it is, makes for a compelling subject, and the filmmakers used this to their advantage. The question arises as to whether they were themselves exploiting Landis. I wonder. At the very least, they cast Landis as an idiot savant, which I think is only one of his facets. They certainly let him play to the camera. On the other hand, the filmmakers left plenty of film running so that viewers could make up their own mind as to the man’s character. As I have said, my conclusion is that Mark Landis reveals himself in the film to be an artist, after all. A con artist.

  735. I just saw the film. I am intrigued by the question of whether Landis’s actions have been harmful, or not. The passion displayed on this very page is proof that others are intrigued as well. Speaking of due diligence let me say up front that I have not read the piece in the Financial Times, nor in the New Yorker. I’m hoping that these sources will help me get a handle on the issues.
    For now, though, I can say with certainty that I feel Landis is a dyed-in-the-wool con man. It is amazing the way he lights up in the museum reception scene. One can sense immediately how a museum curator might be taken in. If he is a con man, one can easily find nature or nurture arguments which attempt to explain why this is so, but the fact remains that at the end of the day, we are responsible for our actions. It is simply wrong to defraud others. To fault Leininger because he insists that Landis is a con artist is absurd.
    A question which I hope to resolve by further research is how the big media reported this story, i.e., in what tone, in what depth, and what conclusions they drew, if any, about the case. The film was rather coy about drawing conclusions. They certainly could have made professionals at the major institutions squirm far more than they did. Yet this part of the story (how DO you authenticate artwork?) went unexplored. This lack of reporting on what institutions should have been doing makes Leininger’s taking up the slack more understandable, a point that is made in the film but rather weakly. Landis’s personality, as odd, wandering, and fractured as it is, makes for a compelling subject, and the filmmakers used this to their advantage. The question arises as to whether they were themselves exploiting Landis. I wonder. At the very least, they cast Landis as an idiot savant, which I think is only one of his facets. They certainly let him play to the camera. On the other hand, the filmmakers left plenty of film running so that viewers could make up their own mind as to the man’s character. As I have said, my conclusion is that Mark Landis reveals himself in the film to be an artist, after all. A con artist.

  736. Happy Birthday Registrar Trek en best wishes for 2016 to all the colleagues

  737. Happy Birthday Registrar Trek en best wishes for 2016 to all the colleagues

  738. Happy Birthday Registrar Trek en best wishes for 2016 to all the colleagues

  739. Happy Birthday Registrar Trek en best wishes for 2